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Title: Optical follow-up study of 32 high-redshift galaxy cluster candidates from Planck with the William Herschel Telescope

Abstract

Abstract The Planck satellite has detected cluster candidates via the Sunyaev Zel’dovich (SZ) effect, but the optical follow-up required to confirm these candidates is still incomplete, especially at high redshifts and for SZ detections at low significance. In this work, we present our analysis of optical observations obtained for 32 Planck cluster candidates using ACAM on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. These cluster candidates were pre-selected using SDSS, WISE, and Pan-STARRS images to likely represent distant clusters at redshifts z ≳ 0.7. We obtain photometric redshift and richness estimates for all of the cluster candidates from a red-sequence analysis of r-, i-, and z-band imaging data. In addition, long-slit observations allow us to measure the redshifts of a subset of the clusters spectroscopically. The optical richness is often lower than expected from the inferred SZ mass when compared to scaling relations previously calibrated at low redshifts. This likely indicates the impact of Eddington bias and projection effects or noise-induced detections, especially at low-SZ significance. Thus, optical follow-up not only provides redshift measurements, but also an important independent verification method. We find that 18 (7) of the candidates at redshifts z > 0.5 (z > 0.8) are at least half asmore » rich as expected from scaling relations, thereby clearly confirming these candidates as massive clusters. While the complex selection function of our sample due to our pre-selection hampers its use for cosmological studies, we do provide a validation of massive high-redshift clusters particularly suitable for further astrophysical investigations.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ORCiD logo [6];  [7]
  1. Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelm Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn, Germany
  2. European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany, IRFU, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  3. IRFU, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France, AIM, CEA, CRNS, Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  4. IRFU, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
  5. Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelm Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn, Germany, Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germany
  6. Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, PO Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden, the Netherlands
  7. Faculty of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr 1, D-81679 Munich, Germany, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching, Germany
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1544605
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Journal Volume: 488 Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0035-8711
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zohren, Hannah, Schrabback, Tim, van der Burg, Remco F. J., Arnaud, Monique, Melin, Jean-Baptiste, van den Busch, Jan Luca, Hoekstra, Henk, and Klein, Matthias. Optical follow-up study of 32 high-redshift galaxy cluster candidates from Planck with the William Herschel Telescope. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1838.
Zohren, Hannah, Schrabback, Tim, van der Burg, Remco F. J., Arnaud, Monique, Melin, Jean-Baptiste, van den Busch, Jan Luca, Hoekstra, Henk, & Klein, Matthias. Optical follow-up study of 32 high-redshift galaxy cluster candidates from Planck with the William Herschel Telescope. United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1838.
Zohren, Hannah, Schrabback, Tim, van der Burg, Remco F. J., Arnaud, Monique, Melin, Jean-Baptiste, van den Busch, Jan Luca, Hoekstra, Henk, and Klein, Matthias. Fri . "Optical follow-up study of 32 high-redshift galaxy cluster candidates from Planck with the William Herschel Telescope". United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1838.
@article{osti_1544605,
title = {Optical follow-up study of 32 high-redshift galaxy cluster candidates from Planck with the William Herschel Telescope},
author = {Zohren, Hannah and Schrabback, Tim and van der Burg, Remco F. J. and Arnaud, Monique and Melin, Jean-Baptiste and van den Busch, Jan Luca and Hoekstra, Henk and Klein, Matthias},
abstractNote = {Abstract The Planck satellite has detected cluster candidates via the Sunyaev Zel’dovich (SZ) effect, but the optical follow-up required to confirm these candidates is still incomplete, especially at high redshifts and for SZ detections at low significance. In this work, we present our analysis of optical observations obtained for 32 Planck cluster candidates using ACAM on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. These cluster candidates were pre-selected using SDSS, WISE, and Pan-STARRS images to likely represent distant clusters at redshifts z ≳ 0.7. We obtain photometric redshift and richness estimates for all of the cluster candidates from a red-sequence analysis of r-, i-, and z-band imaging data. In addition, long-slit observations allow us to measure the redshifts of a subset of the clusters spectroscopically. The optical richness is often lower than expected from the inferred SZ mass when compared to scaling relations previously calibrated at low redshifts. This likely indicates the impact of Eddington bias and projection effects or noise-induced detections, especially at low-SZ significance. Thus, optical follow-up not only provides redshift measurements, but also an important independent verification method. We find that 18 (7) of the candidates at redshifts z > 0.5 (z > 0.8) are at least half as rich as expected from scaling relations, thereby clearly confirming these candidates as massive clusters. While the complex selection function of our sample due to our pre-selection hampers its use for cosmological studies, we do provide a validation of massive high-redshift clusters particularly suitable for further astrophysical investigations.},
doi = {10.1093/mnras/stz1838},
journal = {Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
number = 2,
volume = 488,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {7}
}

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