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Title: Plant Uptake of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide in Coast Redwood Forests: Carbonyl Sulfide Sink in Coast Redwoods

Abstract

The future resilience of coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) is now of critical concern due to the detection of a 33% decline in California coastal fog over the 20th century. However, ecosystem-scale measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance are challenging in coast redwood forests, making it difficult to anticipate the impacts of future changes in fog. To address this methodological problem, we explore coastal variations in atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS), which could potentially be used as a tracer of these ecosystem processes. We conducted atmospheric flask campaigns in coast redwood sites, sampling at surface heights and in the canopy (~70 m), at the University of California Landels-Hill Big Creek Reserve and Big Basin State Park. We simulated COS atmosphere-biosphere exchange with a high-resolution 3-D model to interpret these data. Flask measurements indicated a persistent daytime drawdown between the coast and the downwind forest (45 ± 6 ppt COS) that is consistent with the expected relationship between COS plant uptake, stomatal conductance, and gross primary production. Other sources and sinks of COS that could introduce noise to the COS tracer technique (soils, anthropogenic activity, nocturnal plant uptake, and surface hydrolysis on leaves) are likely to be small relative to daytimemore » COS plant uptake. These results suggest that COS measurements may be useful for making ecosystem-scale estimates of carbon, water, and energy exchange in coast redwood forests.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [4];  [2];  [3];  [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [8];  [9]; ORCiD logo [10]; ORCiD logo [11];  [11]; ORCiD logo [12]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Environmental Studies Dept.
  2. Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States). Sierra Nevada Research Inst.
  3. Carnegie Inst. of Science, Stanford, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States). Sierra Nevada Research Inst.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  5. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
  6. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Integrative Biology
  7. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Global Monitoring Division
  8. Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Science
  9. California Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA (United States)
  10. Univ. of Bremen (Germany)
  11. Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)
  12. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1544350
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1415235
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-8953
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; coast; gross primary production; redwood; fog; carbonyl sulfide; carbon dioxide

Citation Formats

Campbell, J. E., Whelan, M. E., Berry, J. A., Hilton, T. W., Zumkehr, A., Stinecipher, J., Lu, Y., Kornfeld, A., Seibt, U., Dawson, T. E., Montzka, S. A., Baker, I. T., Kulkarni, S., Wang, Y., Herndon, S. C., Zahniser, M. S., Commane, R., and Loik, M. E. Plant Uptake of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide in Coast Redwood Forests: Carbonyl Sulfide Sink in Coast Redwoods. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016JG003703.
Campbell, J. E., Whelan, M. E., Berry, J. A., Hilton, T. W., Zumkehr, A., Stinecipher, J., Lu, Y., Kornfeld, A., Seibt, U., Dawson, T. E., Montzka, S. A., Baker, I. T., Kulkarni, S., Wang, Y., Herndon, S. C., Zahniser, M. S., Commane, R., & Loik, M. E. Plant Uptake of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide in Coast Redwood Forests: Carbonyl Sulfide Sink in Coast Redwoods. United States. doi:10.1002/2016JG003703.
Campbell, J. E., Whelan, M. E., Berry, J. A., Hilton, T. W., Zumkehr, A., Stinecipher, J., Lu, Y., Kornfeld, A., Seibt, U., Dawson, T. E., Montzka, S. A., Baker, I. T., Kulkarni, S., Wang, Y., Herndon, S. C., Zahniser, M. S., Commane, R., and Loik, M. E. Wed . "Plant Uptake of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide in Coast Redwood Forests: Carbonyl Sulfide Sink in Coast Redwoods". United States. doi:10.1002/2016JG003703. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1544350.
@article{osti_1544350,
title = {Plant Uptake of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide in Coast Redwood Forests: Carbonyl Sulfide Sink in Coast Redwoods},
author = {Campbell, J. E. and Whelan, M. E. and Berry, J. A. and Hilton, T. W. and Zumkehr, A. and Stinecipher, J. and Lu, Y. and Kornfeld, A. and Seibt, U. and Dawson, T. E. and Montzka, S. A. and Baker, I. T. and Kulkarni, S. and Wang, Y. and Herndon, S. C. and Zahniser, M. S. and Commane, R. and Loik, M. E.},
abstractNote = {The future resilience of coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) is now of critical concern due to the detection of a 33% decline in California coastal fog over the 20th century. However, ecosystem-scale measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance are challenging in coast redwood forests, making it difficult to anticipate the impacts of future changes in fog. To address this methodological problem, we explore coastal variations in atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS), which could potentially be used as a tracer of these ecosystem processes. We conducted atmospheric flask campaigns in coast redwood sites, sampling at surface heights and in the canopy (~70 m), at the University of California Landels-Hill Big Creek Reserve and Big Basin State Park. We simulated COS atmosphere-biosphere exchange with a high-resolution 3-D model to interpret these data. Flask measurements indicated a persistent daytime drawdown between the coast and the downwind forest (45 ± 6 ppt COS) that is consistent with the expected relationship between COS plant uptake, stomatal conductance, and gross primary production. Other sources and sinks of COS that could introduce noise to the COS tracer technique (soils, anthropogenic activity, nocturnal plant uptake, and surface hydrolysis on leaves) are likely to be small relative to daytime COS plant uptake. These results suggest that COS measurements may be useful for making ecosystem-scale estimates of carbon, water, and energy exchange in coast redwood forests.},
doi = {10.1002/2016JG003703},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences},
number = 12,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

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