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Title: Reviews and syntheses: Carbonyl sulfide as a multi-scale tracer for carbon and water cycles

Abstract

Abstract. For the past decade, observations of carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS)have been investigated as a proxy for carbon uptake by plants. OCS is destroyed by enzymes that interact with CO 2 during photosynthesis, namely carbonic anhydrase (CA) and RuBisCO, where CA is the more important one. The majority of sources of OCS to the atmosphere are geographically separated from this large plant sink,whereas the sources and sinks of CO 2 are co-located in ecosystems. The draw down of OCS can therefore be related to the uptake of CO 2 without the added complication of co-located emissions comparable in magnitude. Here we review the state of our understanding of the global OCS cycle and its applications to ecosystem carbon cycle science. OCS uptake is correlated well toplant carbon uptake, especially at the regional scale. OCS can be used in conjunction with other independent measures of ecosystem function, like solar-induced fluorescence and carbon and water isotope studies. More work needs to be done to generate global coverage for OCS observations and to link this powerful atmospheric tracer to systems where fundamental questions concerning the carbon and water cycle remain.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [8];  [9];  [9]; ORCiD logo [10]; ORCiD logo [11]; ORCiD logo [7];  [12];  [13];  [14]; ORCiD logo [15]; ORCiD logo [16];  [17];  [18] more »;  [19]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [5];  [5];  [20];  [21]; ORCiD logo [22]; ORCiD logo [13]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [21];  [3];  [13]; ORCiD logo [23];  [24];  [11];  [4]; ORCiD logo [25]; ORCiD logo [26]; ORCiD logo [27];  [8] « less
  1. Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  2. GEOMAR Helmholtz-Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel (Germany)
  3. INRA, Villenave d'Ornon (France)
  4. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  5. Univ. of Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria)
  6. Univ. of Bremen, Bremen (Germany)
  7. Univ. of Groningen, Groningen (The Netherlands)
  8. Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)
  9. Lab des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)
  10. Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge, MA (United States)
  11. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  12. UCLA Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  13. Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)
  14. The Open Univ., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom)
  15. Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)
  16. Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)
  17. Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)
  18. Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States)
  19. Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo (Japan)
  20. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)
  21. Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)
  22. Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany)
  23. Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)
  24. Boston Univ., Boston, MA (United States)
  25. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
  26. NOAA/ESRL/GMD, Boulder, CO (United States)
  27. Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1544102
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biogeosciences (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Biogeosciences (Online); Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1726-4189
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Geology

Citation Formats

Whelan, Mary E., Lennartz, Sinikka T., Gimeno, Teresa E., Wehr, Richard, Wohlfahrt, Georg, Wang, Yuting, Kooijmans, Linda M. J., Hilton, Timothy W., Belviso, Sauveur, Peylin, Philippe, Commane, Róisín, Sun, Wu, Chen, Huilin, Kuai, Le, Mammarella, Ivan, Maseyk, Kadmiel, Berkelhammer, Max, Li, King -Fai, Yakir, Dan, Zumkehr, Andrew, Katayama, Yoko, Ogée, Jérôme, Spielmann, Felix M., Kitz, Florian, Rastogi, Bharat, Kesselmeier, Jürgen, Marshall, Julia, Erkkilä, Kukka -Maaria, Wingate, Lisa, Meredith, Laura K., He, Wei, Bunk, Rüdiger, Launois, Thomas, Vesala, Timo, Schmidt, Johan A., Fichot, Cédric G., Seibt, Ulli, Saleska, Scott, Saltzman, Eric S., Montzka, Stephen A., Berry, Joseph A., and Campbell, J. Elliott. Reviews and syntheses: Carbonyl sulfide as a multi-scale tracer for carbon and water cycles. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.5194/bg-15-3625-2018.
Whelan, Mary E., Lennartz, Sinikka T., Gimeno, Teresa E., Wehr, Richard, Wohlfahrt, Georg, Wang, Yuting, Kooijmans, Linda M. J., Hilton, Timothy W., Belviso, Sauveur, Peylin, Philippe, Commane, Róisín, Sun, Wu, Chen, Huilin, Kuai, Le, Mammarella, Ivan, Maseyk, Kadmiel, Berkelhammer, Max, Li, King -Fai, Yakir, Dan, Zumkehr, Andrew, Katayama, Yoko, Ogée, Jérôme, Spielmann, Felix M., Kitz, Florian, Rastogi, Bharat, Kesselmeier, Jürgen, Marshall, Julia, Erkkilä, Kukka -Maaria, Wingate, Lisa, Meredith, Laura K., He, Wei, Bunk, Rüdiger, Launois, Thomas, Vesala, Timo, Schmidt, Johan A., Fichot, Cédric G., Seibt, Ulli, Saleska, Scott, Saltzman, Eric S., Montzka, Stephen A., Berry, Joseph A., & Campbell, J. Elliott. Reviews and syntheses: Carbonyl sulfide as a multi-scale tracer for carbon and water cycles. United States. doi:10.5194/bg-15-3625-2018.
Whelan, Mary E., Lennartz, Sinikka T., Gimeno, Teresa E., Wehr, Richard, Wohlfahrt, Georg, Wang, Yuting, Kooijmans, Linda M. J., Hilton, Timothy W., Belviso, Sauveur, Peylin, Philippe, Commane, Róisín, Sun, Wu, Chen, Huilin, Kuai, Le, Mammarella, Ivan, Maseyk, Kadmiel, Berkelhammer, Max, Li, King -Fai, Yakir, Dan, Zumkehr, Andrew, Katayama, Yoko, Ogée, Jérôme, Spielmann, Felix M., Kitz, Florian, Rastogi, Bharat, Kesselmeier, Jürgen, Marshall, Julia, Erkkilä, Kukka -Maaria, Wingate, Lisa, Meredith, Laura K., He, Wei, Bunk, Rüdiger, Launois, Thomas, Vesala, Timo, Schmidt, Johan A., Fichot, Cédric G., Seibt, Ulli, Saleska, Scott, Saltzman, Eric S., Montzka, Stephen A., Berry, Joseph A., and Campbell, J. Elliott. Mon . "Reviews and syntheses: Carbonyl sulfide as a multi-scale tracer for carbon and water cycles". United States. doi:10.5194/bg-15-3625-2018. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1544102.
@article{osti_1544102,
title = {Reviews and syntheses: Carbonyl sulfide as a multi-scale tracer for carbon and water cycles},
author = {Whelan, Mary E. and Lennartz, Sinikka T. and Gimeno, Teresa E. and Wehr, Richard and Wohlfahrt, Georg and Wang, Yuting and Kooijmans, Linda M. J. and Hilton, Timothy W. and Belviso, Sauveur and Peylin, Philippe and Commane, Róisín and Sun, Wu and Chen, Huilin and Kuai, Le and Mammarella, Ivan and Maseyk, Kadmiel and Berkelhammer, Max and Li, King -Fai and Yakir, Dan and Zumkehr, Andrew and Katayama, Yoko and Ogée, Jérôme and Spielmann, Felix M. and Kitz, Florian and Rastogi, Bharat and Kesselmeier, Jürgen and Marshall, Julia and Erkkilä, Kukka -Maaria and Wingate, Lisa and Meredith, Laura K. and He, Wei and Bunk, Rüdiger and Launois, Thomas and Vesala, Timo and Schmidt, Johan A. and Fichot, Cédric G. and Seibt, Ulli and Saleska, Scott and Saltzman, Eric S. and Montzka, Stephen A. and Berry, Joseph A. and Campbell, J. Elliott},
abstractNote = {Abstract. For the past decade, observations of carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS)have been investigated as a proxy for carbon uptake by plants. OCS is destroyed by enzymes that interact with CO2 during photosynthesis, namely carbonic anhydrase (CA) and RuBisCO, where CA is the more important one. The majority of sources of OCS to the atmosphere are geographically separated from this large plant sink,whereas the sources and sinks of CO2 are co-located in ecosystems. The draw down of OCS can therefore be related to the uptake of CO2 without the added complication of co-located emissions comparable in magnitude. Here we review the state of our understanding of the global OCS cycle and its applications to ecosystem carbon cycle science. OCS uptake is correlated well toplant carbon uptake, especially at the regional scale. OCS can be used in conjunction with other independent measures of ecosystem function, like solar-induced fluorescence and carbon and water isotope studies. More work needs to be done to generate global coverage for OCS observations and to link this powerful atmospheric tracer to systems where fundamental questions concerning the carbon and water cycle remain.},
doi = {10.5194/bg-15-3625-2018},
journal = {Biogeosciences (Online)},
number = 12,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

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