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Title: Evolution of Oxyhalide Crystals under Electron Beam Irradiation: An in Situ Method To Understand the Origin of Structural Instability

Abstract

The oxyhalides have attracted growing interest because of their excellent photocatalytic performance. However, their structural instability hampers further development toward practical applications, a major challenge of current concerns. It is appealing to figure out the origin of structural instability and guide the design of advanced oxyhalide crystals for efficient photocatalysis. In this study, the decomposition of BiOCl crystals, a typical oxyhalide, is triggered by electron beam irradiation and investigated in situ by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the instability originates from the unique layered structure of BiOCl crystals; the interlayer van der Waals bonds are easily broken under electron beam irradiation via the assistance of hydroxyl groups. This facilitates the formation of O/Cl-deficient BiO 1–xCl 1–y species, Bi metal nanoparticles, and nanobubbles (gaseous substance) that are confined between the adjacent layers. Surface reconstruction would be an effective way to stabilize the oxyhalide crystals.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chongqing Univ. (China)
  2. Chongqing Univ. (China)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Chongqing Univ. (China); Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Univ. of California, Oakland, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1543621
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Inorganic Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 57; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID: ISSN 0020-1669
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Chemistry

Citation Formats

Wu, Sujuan, Sun, Jianguo, Yang, Shi -Ze, He, Qiongyao, Zhang, Ling, and Sun, Lidong. Evolution of Oxyhalide Crystals under Electron Beam Irradiation: An in Situ Method To Understand the Origin of Structural Instability. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.8b00953.
Wu, Sujuan, Sun, Jianguo, Yang, Shi -Ze, He, Qiongyao, Zhang, Ling, & Sun, Lidong. Evolution of Oxyhalide Crystals under Electron Beam Irradiation: An in Situ Method To Understand the Origin of Structural Instability. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.8b00953.
Wu, Sujuan, Sun, Jianguo, Yang, Shi -Ze, He, Qiongyao, Zhang, Ling, and Sun, Lidong. Tue . "Evolution of Oxyhalide Crystals under Electron Beam Irradiation: An in Situ Method To Understand the Origin of Structural Instability". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.8b00953. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1543621.
@article{osti_1543621,
title = {Evolution of Oxyhalide Crystals under Electron Beam Irradiation: An in Situ Method To Understand the Origin of Structural Instability},
author = {Wu, Sujuan and Sun, Jianguo and Yang, Shi -Ze and He, Qiongyao and Zhang, Ling and Sun, Lidong},
abstractNote = {The oxyhalides have attracted growing interest because of their excellent photocatalytic performance. However, their structural instability hampers further development toward practical applications, a major challenge of current concerns. It is appealing to figure out the origin of structural instability and guide the design of advanced oxyhalide crystals for efficient photocatalysis. In this study, the decomposition of BiOCl crystals, a typical oxyhalide, is triggered by electron beam irradiation and investigated in situ by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the instability originates from the unique layered structure of BiOCl crystals; the interlayer van der Waals bonds are easily broken under electron beam irradiation via the assistance of hydroxyl groups. This facilitates the formation of O/Cl-deficient BiO1–xCl1–y species, Bi metal nanoparticles, and nanobubbles (gaseous substance) that are confined between the adjacent layers. Surface reconstruction would be an effective way to stabilize the oxyhalide crystals.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.inorgchem.8b00953},
journal = {Inorganic Chemistry},
number = 15,
volume = 57,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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