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Title: Experimental evidence for superionic water ice using shock compression

Abstract

In stark contrast to common ice, Ih, water ice at planetary interior conditions has been predicted to become superionic with fast- diffusing (that is, liquid-like) hydrogen ions moving within a solid lattice of oxygen. Likely to constitute a large fraction of icy giant planets, this extraordinary phase has not been observed in the laboratory. Here, we report laser-driven shock-compression experiments on water ice VII. Using time-resolved optical pyrometry and laser velocimetry measurements as well as sup- porting density functional theory–molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations, we document the shock equation of state of H 2O to unprecedented extreme conditions and unravel thermodynamic signatures showing that ice melts near 5,000 K at 190 GPa. Furthermore, optical reflectivity and absorption measurements also demonstrate the low electronic conductivity of ice, which, combined with previous measurements of the total electrical conductivity under reverberating shock compression, provides experimental evidence for superionic conduction in water ice at planetary interior conditions, verifying a 30-year-old prediction.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [2];  [4];  [2];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)
  4. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Contributing Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, University of Rochester
OSTI Identifier:
1542614
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002729
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1745-2473
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN

Citation Formats

Millot, Marius, Hamel, Sebastien, Rygg, J. Ryan, Celliers, Peter M., Collins, Gilbert W., Coppari, Federica, Fratanduono, Dayne E., Jeanloz, Raymond, Swift, Damian C., and Eggert, Jon H. Experimental evidence for superionic water ice using shock compression. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41567-017-0017-4.
Millot, Marius, Hamel, Sebastien, Rygg, J. Ryan, Celliers, Peter M., Collins, Gilbert W., Coppari, Federica, Fratanduono, Dayne E., Jeanloz, Raymond, Swift, Damian C., & Eggert, Jon H. Experimental evidence for superionic water ice using shock compression. United States. doi:10.1038/s41567-017-0017-4.
Millot, Marius, Hamel, Sebastien, Rygg, J. Ryan, Celliers, Peter M., Collins, Gilbert W., Coppari, Federica, Fratanduono, Dayne E., Jeanloz, Raymond, Swift, Damian C., and Eggert, Jon H. Mon . "Experimental evidence for superionic water ice using shock compression". United States. doi:10.1038/s41567-017-0017-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1542614.
@article{osti_1542614,
title = {Experimental evidence for superionic water ice using shock compression},
author = {Millot, Marius and Hamel, Sebastien and Rygg, J. Ryan and Celliers, Peter M. and Collins, Gilbert W. and Coppari, Federica and Fratanduono, Dayne E. and Jeanloz, Raymond and Swift, Damian C. and Eggert, Jon H.},
abstractNote = {In stark contrast to common ice, Ih, water ice at planetary interior conditions has been predicted to become superionic with fast- diffusing (that is, liquid-like) hydrogen ions moving within a solid lattice of oxygen. Likely to constitute a large fraction of icy giant planets, this extraordinary phase has not been observed in the laboratory. Here, we report laser-driven shock-compression experiments on water ice VII. Using time-resolved optical pyrometry and laser velocimetry measurements as well as sup- porting density functional theory–molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations, we document the shock equation of state of H2O to unprecedented extreme conditions and unravel thermodynamic signatures showing that ice melts near 5,000 K at 190 GPa. Furthermore, optical reflectivity and absorption measurements also demonstrate the low electronic conductivity of ice, which, combined with previous measurements of the total electrical conductivity under reverberating shock compression, provides experimental evidence for superionic conduction in water ice at planetary interior conditions, verifying a 30-year-old prediction.},
doi = {10.1038/s41567-017-0017-4},
journal = {Nature Physics},
number = 3,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

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Cited by: 19 works
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