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Title: The case for a high-redshift origin of GRB 100205A

Abstract

Abstract The number of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) known to have occurred in the distant Universe (z > 5) is small (∼15); however, these events provide a powerful way of probing star formation at the onset of galaxy evolution. In this paper, we present the case for GRB 100205A being a largely overlooked high-redshift event. While initially noted as a high-z candidate, this event and its host galaxy have not been explored in detail. By combining optical and near-infrared Gemini afterglow imaging (at t < 1.3 d since burst) with deep late-time limits on host emission from the Hubble Space Telescope, we show that the most likely scenario is that GRB 100205A arose in the range 4 < z < 8. GRB 100205A is an example of a burst whose afterglow, even at ∼1 h post burst, could only be identified by 8-m class IR observations, and suggests that such observations of all optically dark bursts may be necessary to significantly enhance the number of high-redshift GRBs known.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [1];  [9];  [10];  [1];  [11]; ORCiD logo [12];  [11]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
  2. Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK, Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  3. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
  4. Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
  5. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, DMD 20771, USA, Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
  6. Department of Physics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA
  7. College of Science and Mathematics, University of the Virgin Islands, #2 Brewers Bay Road, Charlotte Amalie, USVI 00802
  8. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
  9. Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen ø, Denmark
  10. Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland
  11. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
  12. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1542502
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Journal Volume: 488 Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0035-8711
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chrimes, A. A., Levan, A. J., Stanway, E. R., Berger, E., Bloom, J. S., Cenko, S. B., Cobb, B. E., Cucchiara, A., Fruchter, A. S., Gompertz, B. P., Hjorth, J., Jakobsson, P., Lyman, J. D., O’Brien, P., Perley, D. A., Tanvir, N. R., Wheatley, P. J., and Wiersema, K. The case for a high-redshift origin of GRB 100205A. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1811.
Chrimes, A. A., Levan, A. J., Stanway, E. R., Berger, E., Bloom, J. S., Cenko, S. B., Cobb, B. E., Cucchiara, A., Fruchter, A. S., Gompertz, B. P., Hjorth, J., Jakobsson, P., Lyman, J. D., O’Brien, P., Perley, D. A., Tanvir, N. R., Wheatley, P. J., & Wiersema, K. The case for a high-redshift origin of GRB 100205A. United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1811.
Chrimes, A. A., Levan, A. J., Stanway, E. R., Berger, E., Bloom, J. S., Cenko, S. B., Cobb, B. E., Cucchiara, A., Fruchter, A. S., Gompertz, B. P., Hjorth, J., Jakobsson, P., Lyman, J. D., O’Brien, P., Perley, D. A., Tanvir, N. R., Wheatley, P. J., and Wiersema, K. Tue . "The case for a high-redshift origin of GRB 100205A". United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1811.
@article{osti_1542502,
title = {The case for a high-redshift origin of GRB 100205A},
author = {Chrimes, A. A. and Levan, A. J. and Stanway, E. R. and Berger, E. and Bloom, J. S. and Cenko, S. B. and Cobb, B. E. and Cucchiara, A. and Fruchter, A. S. and Gompertz, B. P. and Hjorth, J. and Jakobsson, P. and Lyman, J. D. and O’Brien, P. and Perley, D. A. and Tanvir, N. R. and Wheatley, P. J. and Wiersema, K.},
abstractNote = {Abstract The number of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) known to have occurred in the distant Universe (z > 5) is small (∼15); however, these events provide a powerful way of probing star formation at the onset of galaxy evolution. In this paper, we present the case for GRB 100205A being a largely overlooked high-redshift event. While initially noted as a high-z candidate, this event and its host galaxy have not been explored in detail. By combining optical and near-infrared Gemini afterglow imaging (at t < 1.3 d since burst) with deep late-time limits on host emission from the Hubble Space Telescope, we show that the most likely scenario is that GRB 100205A arose in the range 4 < z < 8. GRB 100205A is an example of a burst whose afterglow, even at ∼1 h post burst, could only be identified by 8-m class IR observations, and suggests that such observations of all optically dark bursts may be necessary to significantly enhance the number of high-redshift GRBs known.},
doi = {10.1093/mnras/stz1811},
journal = {Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
number = 1,
volume = 488,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {7}
}

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