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Title: A viral reckoning: Viruses emerge as essential manipulators of global ecosystems

Abstract

Viruses are integral components and critical regulators of microbial ecosystems. In terms of numbers alone, virus-like particles seemingly outnumber microbial cells in every ecosystem (Weinbauer and Rassoulzadegan, 2004), with a virus-to-microbe ratio typically ranging from 1 to 100 (Wigington et al., 2016). While challenging to assess, profound ecological and evolutionary impacts of virus-host interactions have nonetheless been uncovered across a broad range of ecosystems, from the bottom of the oceans to bubbling acidic hot springs, coral reefs and thawing permafrost (Suttle, 2007; Rohwer and Vega Thurber, 2009; Dell'Anno et al., 2015; Williamson et al., 2017; Emerson et al., 2018). Collectively, these studies highlighted multiple mechanisms by which viruses drive ecological and evolutionary processes in microbial ecosystems (Koskella and Brockhurst, 2014; Breitbart et al., 2018). While the ecological importance of viruses is now undeniable, a thorough assessment of their influence on any microbial system remains elusive. Two of the current challenges are (i) comprehensively exploring and classifying environmental viral diversity and (ii) establishing host linkages for uncultivated viruses. A number of recent methodological innovations suggest, however, that these hurdles may be overcome sooner rather than later (Mokili et al., 2012; Dang and Sullivan, 2014; Brum and Sullivan, 2015; Sepulveda et al.,more » 2016; Sullivan et al., 2017). Here in this paper, based on these latest advances in the field of viral ecology and genomics, we try to imagine how a comprehensive host-resolved mapping of the viral sequence space will enable researchers to address long-standing viral ecology questions in an unprecedented way. We present these as three stories relating how we picture (and/or wish) viral ecology research could be conducted 10 years from now.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1542326
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1480135
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Microbiology Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1758-2229
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Roux, Simon, and Brum, Jennifer R. A viral reckoning: Viruses emerge as essential manipulators of global ecosystems. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12700.
Roux, Simon, & Brum, Jennifer R. A viral reckoning: Viruses emerge as essential manipulators of global ecosystems. United States. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12700.
Roux, Simon, and Brum, Jennifer R. Tue . "A viral reckoning: Viruses emerge as essential manipulators of global ecosystems". United States. doi:10.1111/1758-2229.12700. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1542326.
@article{osti_1542326,
title = {A viral reckoning: Viruses emerge as essential manipulators of global ecosystems},
author = {Roux, Simon and Brum, Jennifer R.},
abstractNote = {Viruses are integral components and critical regulators of microbial ecosystems. In terms of numbers alone, virus-like particles seemingly outnumber microbial cells in every ecosystem (Weinbauer and Rassoulzadegan, 2004), with a virus-to-microbe ratio typically ranging from 1 to 100 (Wigington et al., 2016). While challenging to assess, profound ecological and evolutionary impacts of virus-host interactions have nonetheless been uncovered across a broad range of ecosystems, from the bottom of the oceans to bubbling acidic hot springs, coral reefs and thawing permafrost (Suttle, 2007; Rohwer and Vega Thurber, 2009; Dell'Anno et al., 2015; Williamson et al., 2017; Emerson et al., 2018). Collectively, these studies highlighted multiple mechanisms by which viruses drive ecological and evolutionary processes in microbial ecosystems (Koskella and Brockhurst, 2014; Breitbart et al., 2018). While the ecological importance of viruses is now undeniable, a thorough assessment of their influence on any microbial system remains elusive. Two of the current challenges are (i) comprehensively exploring and classifying environmental viral diversity and (ii) establishing host linkages for uncultivated viruses. A number of recent methodological innovations suggest, however, that these hurdles may be overcome sooner rather than later (Mokili et al., 2012; Dang and Sullivan, 2014; Brum and Sullivan, 2015; Sepulveda et al., 2016; Sullivan et al., 2017). Here in this paper, based on these latest advances in the field of viral ecology and genomics, we try to imagine how a comprehensive host-resolved mapping of the viral sequence space will enable researchers to address long-standing viral ecology questions in an unprecedented way. We present these as three stories relating how we picture (and/or wish) viral ecology research could be conducted 10 years from now.},
doi = {10.1111/1758-2229.12700},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

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