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Title: 3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications

Abstract

Realization of high temperature physical measurement sensors, which are needed in many of the current and emerging technologies, is challenging due to the degradation of their electrical stability by drift currents, material oxidation, thermal strain, and creep. In this paper, for the first time, we demonstrate that 3D printed sensors show a metamaterial-like behavior, resulting in superior performance such as high sensitivity, low thermal strain, and enhanced thermal stability. The sensors were fabricated using silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs), using an advanced Aerosol Jet based additive printing method followed by thermal sintering. The sensors were tested under cyclic strain up to a temperature of 500 °C and showed a gauge factor of 3.15 ± 0.086, which is about 57% higher than that of those available commercially. The sensor thermal strain was also an order of magnitude lower than that of commercial gages for operation up to a temperature of 500 °C. An analytical model was developed to account for the enhanced performance of such printed sensors based on enhanced lateral contraction of the NP films due to the porosity, a behavior akin to cellular metamaterials. The results demonstrate the potential of 3D printing technology as a pathway to realize highly stable and high-performance sensors formore » high temperature applications.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA; School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163, USA
  2. School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163, USA
  3. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1540121
Grant/Contract Number:  
FE0026170
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Physics

Citation Formats

Rahman, Md Taibur, Moser, Russell, Zbib, Hussein M., Ramana, C. V., and Panat, Rahul. 3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4999076.
Rahman, Md Taibur, Moser, Russell, Zbib, Hussein M., Ramana, C. V., & Panat, Rahul. 3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4999076.
Rahman, Md Taibur, Moser, Russell, Zbib, Hussein M., Ramana, C. V., and Panat, Rahul. Sun . "3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4999076. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1540121.
@article{osti_1540121,
title = {3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications},
author = {Rahman, Md Taibur and Moser, Russell and Zbib, Hussein M. and Ramana, C. V. and Panat, Rahul},
abstractNote = {Realization of high temperature physical measurement sensors, which are needed in many of the current and emerging technologies, is challenging due to the degradation of their electrical stability by drift currents, material oxidation, thermal strain, and creep. In this paper, for the first time, we demonstrate that 3D printed sensors show a metamaterial-like behavior, resulting in superior performance such as high sensitivity, low thermal strain, and enhanced thermal stability. The sensors were fabricated using silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs), using an advanced Aerosol Jet based additive printing method followed by thermal sintering. The sensors were tested under cyclic strain up to a temperature of 500 °C and showed a gauge factor of 3.15 ± 0.086, which is about 57% higher than that of those available commercially. The sensor thermal strain was also an order of magnitude lower than that of commercial gages for operation up to a temperature of 500 °C. An analytical model was developed to account for the enhanced performance of such printed sensors based on enhanced lateral contraction of the NP films due to the porosity, a behavior akin to cellular metamaterials. The results demonstrate the potential of 3D printing technology as a pathway to realize highly stable and high-performance sensors for high temperature applications.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4999076},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 123,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

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Cited by: 3 works
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Works referenced in this record:

Printable ion-gel gate dielectrics for low-voltage polymer thin-film transistors on plastic
journal, October 2008

  • Cho, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jiyoul; Xia, Yu
  • Nature Materials, Vol. 7, Issue 11, p. 900-906
  • DOI: 10.1038/nmat2291