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Title: Influence of Emissions and Aqueous Processing on Particles Containing Black Carbon in a Polluted Urban Environment: Insights From a Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

Abstract

Inorganic and organic coatings on black carbon (BC) particles can enhance light absorption and affect atmospheric lifetimes of BC-containing particles and thus have significant implications for climate. To study the physical and chemical characteristics of atmospheric BC and BC-associated coatings, a soot particle-aerosol mass spectrometer was deployed during the winter of 2014–2015 in Fresno, a city located in the San Joaquin Valley of California, to selectively analyze BC-containing particles. Comparing soot particle-aerosol mass spectrometer measurements to those from the collocated single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer, we found that 17% of total submicrometer aerosol mass was associated with BC-containing particles, suggesting that a majority of the fine particles in Fresno contained no BC. Most BC-containing particles appeared to be associated with residential wood burning and vehicular traffic. These particles typically had a bulk-average mass ratio of coating to BC (R coat/rBC) less than 2. However, during periods of persistent fog larger R coat/rBC values were observed, with the coatings primarily composed of secondary inorganic and organic components that likely resulted from aqueous-phase processing. Specifically, compared to periods with less fog, the BC coating increased in concentration and contained a larger fraction of nitrate and oxidized organic matter.more » The size distributions of BC and associated organic coating were generally centered around 300 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter. However, during foggy periods BC had an additional peak at ~400 nm and organics and nitrate displayed a prominent mode in the accumulation size range.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
  2. Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1537325
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1457592
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-07ER84890; SC0014620
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences

Citation Formats

Collier, Sonya, Williams, Leah R., Onasch, Timothy B., Cappa, Christopher D., Zhang, Xiaolu, Russell, Lynn M., Chen, Chia-Li, Sanchez, Kevin J., Worsnop, Douglas R., and Zhang, Qi. Influence of Emissions and Aqueous Processing on Particles Containing Black Carbon in a Polluted Urban Environment: Insights From a Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/2017jd027851.
Collier, Sonya, Williams, Leah R., Onasch, Timothy B., Cappa, Christopher D., Zhang, Xiaolu, Russell, Lynn M., Chen, Chia-Li, Sanchez, Kevin J., Worsnop, Douglas R., & Zhang, Qi. Influence of Emissions and Aqueous Processing on Particles Containing Black Carbon in a Polluted Urban Environment: Insights From a Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. United States. doi:10.1002/2017jd027851.
Collier, Sonya, Williams, Leah R., Onasch, Timothy B., Cappa, Christopher D., Zhang, Xiaolu, Russell, Lynn M., Chen, Chia-Li, Sanchez, Kevin J., Worsnop, Douglas R., and Zhang, Qi. Wed . "Influence of Emissions and Aqueous Processing on Particles Containing Black Carbon in a Polluted Urban Environment: Insights From a Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer". United States. doi:10.1002/2017jd027851. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1537325.
@article{osti_1537325,
title = {Influence of Emissions and Aqueous Processing on Particles Containing Black Carbon in a Polluted Urban Environment: Insights From a Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer},
author = {Collier, Sonya and Williams, Leah R. and Onasch, Timothy B. and Cappa, Christopher D. and Zhang, Xiaolu and Russell, Lynn M. and Chen, Chia-Li and Sanchez, Kevin J. and Worsnop, Douglas R. and Zhang, Qi},
abstractNote = {Inorganic and organic coatings on black carbon (BC) particles can enhance light absorption and affect atmospheric lifetimes of BC-containing particles and thus have significant implications for climate. To study the physical and chemical characteristics of atmospheric BC and BC-associated coatings, a soot particle-aerosol mass spectrometer was deployed during the winter of 2014–2015 in Fresno, a city located in the San Joaquin Valley of California, to selectively analyze BC-containing particles. Comparing soot particle-aerosol mass spectrometer measurements to those from the collocated single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer, we found that 17% of total submicrometer aerosol mass was associated with BC-containing particles, suggesting that a majority of the fine particles in Fresno contained no BC. Most BC-containing particles appeared to be associated with residential wood burning and vehicular traffic. These particles typically had a bulk-average mass ratio of coating to BC (Rcoat/rBC) less than 2. However, during periods of persistent fog larger Rcoat/rBC values were observed, with the coatings primarily composed of secondary inorganic and organic components that likely resulted from aqueous-phase processing. Specifically, compared to periods with less fog, the BC coating increased in concentration and contained a larger fraction of nitrate and oxidized organic matter. The size distributions of BC and associated organic coating were generally centered around 300 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter. However, during foggy periods BC had an additional peak at ~400 nm and organics and nitrate displayed a prominent mode in the accumulation size range.},
doi = {10.1002/2017jd027851},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
number = 12,
volume = 123,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

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