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Title: Achieving Health Security and Threat Reduction through Sharing Sequence Data

Abstract

With the rapid development and broad applications of next-generation sequencing platforms and bioinformatic analytical tools, genomics has become a popular area for biosurveillance and international scientific collaboration. Governments from countries including the United States (US), Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom have leveraged these advancements to support international cooperative programs that aim to reduce biological threats and build scientific capacity worldwide. A recent conference panel addressed the impacts of the enhancement of genomic sequencing capabilities through three major US bioengagement programs on international scientific engagement and biosecurity risk reduction. Here, the panel contrasted the risks and benefits of supporting the enhancement of genomic sequencing capabilities through international scientific engagement to achieve biological threat reduction and global health security. The lower costs and new bioinformatic tools available have led to the greater application of sequencing to biosurveillance. Strengthening sequencing capabilities globally for the diagnosis and detection of infectious diseases through mutual collaborations has a high return on investment for increasing global health security. International collaborations based on genomics and shared sequence data can build and leverage scientific networks and improve the timeliness and accuracy of disease surveillance reporting needed to identify and mitigate infectious disease outbreaks and comply with international norms.more » Further efforts to promote scientific transparency within international collaboration will improve trust, reduce threats, and promote global health security.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9]
  1. MRIGlobal, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  3. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)
  4. National Center for Disease Control and Public Health, Tbilisi (Georgia)
  5. Dept. of State, Washington, D.C. (United States)
  6. USAID, Arlington, VA (United States)
  7. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  8. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
  9. Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1532731
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-19-24621
Journal ID: ISSN 2414-6366
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2414-6366
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Biological Science; surveillance; biosecurity; global health security; sequencing; scientific engagement; threat reduction

Citation Formats

Yeh, Kenneth, Fair, Jeanne Marie, Cui, Helen Hong, Newman, Carl, Braunstein, Gavin, Chanturia, Gvantsa, Vora, Sapana, Chittenden, Kendra, Tseng, Ashley, Monagin, Corina, and Fletcher, Jacqueline. Achieving Health Security and Threat Reduction through Sharing Sequence Data. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/tropicalmed4020078.
Yeh, Kenneth, Fair, Jeanne Marie, Cui, Helen Hong, Newman, Carl, Braunstein, Gavin, Chanturia, Gvantsa, Vora, Sapana, Chittenden, Kendra, Tseng, Ashley, Monagin, Corina, & Fletcher, Jacqueline. Achieving Health Security and Threat Reduction through Sharing Sequence Data. United States. doi:10.3390/tropicalmed4020078.
Yeh, Kenneth, Fair, Jeanne Marie, Cui, Helen Hong, Newman, Carl, Braunstein, Gavin, Chanturia, Gvantsa, Vora, Sapana, Chittenden, Kendra, Tseng, Ashley, Monagin, Corina, and Fletcher, Jacqueline. Tue . "Achieving Health Security and Threat Reduction through Sharing Sequence Data". United States. doi:10.3390/tropicalmed4020078. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1532731.
@article{osti_1532731,
title = {Achieving Health Security and Threat Reduction through Sharing Sequence Data},
author = {Yeh, Kenneth and Fair, Jeanne Marie and Cui, Helen Hong and Newman, Carl and Braunstein, Gavin and Chanturia, Gvantsa and Vora, Sapana and Chittenden, Kendra and Tseng, Ashley and Monagin, Corina and Fletcher, Jacqueline},
abstractNote = {With the rapid development and broad applications of next-generation sequencing platforms and bioinformatic analytical tools, genomics has become a popular area for biosurveillance and international scientific collaboration. Governments from countries including the United States (US), Canada, Germany, and the United Kingdom have leveraged these advancements to support international cooperative programs that aim to reduce biological threats and build scientific capacity worldwide. A recent conference panel addressed the impacts of the enhancement of genomic sequencing capabilities through three major US bioengagement programs on international scientific engagement and biosecurity risk reduction. Here, the panel contrasted the risks and benefits of supporting the enhancement of genomic sequencing capabilities through international scientific engagement to achieve biological threat reduction and global health security. The lower costs and new bioinformatic tools available have led to the greater application of sequencing to biosurveillance. Strengthening sequencing capabilities globally for the diagnosis and detection of infectious diseases through mutual collaborations has a high return on investment for increasing global health security. International collaborations based on genomics and shared sequence data can build and leverage scientific networks and improve the timeliness and accuracy of disease surveillance reporting needed to identify and mitigate infectious disease outbreaks and comply with international norms. Further efforts to promote scientific transparency within international collaboration will improve trust, reduce threats, and promote global health security.},
doi = {10.3390/tropicalmed4020078},
journal = {Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease},
number = 2,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

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