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Title: Surface energy of air fractionated corn stover

Abstract

Despite decades of research, Integrated Biorefineries (IBRs) are still not commercially viable because of the long-standing, unresolved challenges related to biomass solids handling and transport (e.g., flowability and fouling), and pretreatment e.g., wettability and conversion). The compendium of challenges facing IBRs lead to operational reliability and time-on-stream estimates of 30%, yet economically viable IBRs require greater than 90% operational reliabilities. The performance of commercial solids handling operations is largely dependent on the fundamental thermodynamic property, surface energy. Combining surface area, thermogravimetric, and inverse gas chromatography analyses, we show the observed differences in surface energy (e.g., wettability and work of cohesion) for anatomically air fractionated corn ( Zea mays L.) stover. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of understanding and tuning biomass surface energy to improve IBR solids handling and transport, and pretreatment operations.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1532730
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-19-24608
Journal ID: ISSN 0926-6690
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Industrial Crops and Products
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 137; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0926-6690
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Energy Sciences; Material Science; surface energy; corn stover; biomass; inverse gas chromatography

Citation Formats

Leal, Juan Hilario, Moore, Cameron M., Sutton, Andrew D., and Semelsberger, Troy Allen. Surface energy of air fractionated corn stover. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.indcrop.2019.05.046.
Leal, Juan Hilario, Moore, Cameron M., Sutton, Andrew D., & Semelsberger, Troy Allen. Surface energy of air fractionated corn stover. United States. doi:10.1016/j.indcrop.2019.05.046.
Leal, Juan Hilario, Moore, Cameron M., Sutton, Andrew D., and Semelsberger, Troy Allen. Thu . "Surface energy of air fractionated corn stover". United States. doi:10.1016/j.indcrop.2019.05.046.
@article{osti_1532730,
title = {Surface energy of air fractionated corn stover},
author = {Leal, Juan Hilario and Moore, Cameron M. and Sutton, Andrew D. and Semelsberger, Troy Allen},
abstractNote = {Despite decades of research, Integrated Biorefineries (IBRs) are still not commercially viable because of the long-standing, unresolved challenges related to biomass solids handling and transport (e.g., flowability and fouling), and pretreatment e.g., wettability and conversion). The compendium of challenges facing IBRs lead to operational reliability and time-on-stream estimates of 30%, yet economically viable IBRs require greater than 90% operational reliabilities. The performance of commercial solids handling operations is largely dependent on the fundamental thermodynamic property, surface energy. Combining surface area, thermogravimetric, and inverse gas chromatography analyses, we show the observed differences in surface energy (e.g., wettability and work of cohesion) for anatomically air fractionated corn (Zea mays L.) stover. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of understanding and tuning biomass surface energy to improve IBR solids handling and transport, and pretreatment operations.},
doi = {10.1016/j.indcrop.2019.05.046},
journal = {Industrial Crops and Products},
number = C,
volume = 137,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on May 30, 2020
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