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Title: Living at the Extremes: Extremophiles and the Limits of Life in a Planetary Context

Abstract

Prokaryotic life has dominated most of the evolutionary history of our planet, evolving to occupy virtually all available environmental niches. Extremophiles, especially those thriving under multiple extremes, represent a key area of research for multiple disciplines, spanning from the study of adaptations to harsh conditions, to the biogeochemical cycling of elements. Extremophile research also has implications for origin of life studies and the search for life on other planetary and celestial bodies. In this article, we will review the current state of knowledge for the biospace in which life operates on Earth and will discuss it in a planetary context, highlighting knowledge gaps and areas of opportunity.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  4. Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Univ. of Naples Federico II (Italy); Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); National Research Council, Ancona (Italy)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1532616
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-772157
Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X; 963912
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: na; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; polyextremophiles; limits of life; astrobiology; habitability and astrobiology; extremophiles/ extremophily; search for life

Citation Formats

Merino, Nancy, Aronson, Heidi S., Bojanova, Diana P., Feyhl-Buska, Jayme, Wong, Michael L., Zhang, Shu, and Giovannelli, Donato. Living at the Extremes: Extremophiles and the Limits of Life in a Planetary Context. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2019.00780.
Merino, Nancy, Aronson, Heidi S., Bojanova, Diana P., Feyhl-Buska, Jayme, Wong, Michael L., Zhang, Shu, & Giovannelli, Donato. Living at the Extremes: Extremophiles and the Limits of Life in a Planetary Context. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2019.00780.
Merino, Nancy, Aronson, Heidi S., Bojanova, Diana P., Feyhl-Buska, Jayme, Wong, Michael L., Zhang, Shu, and Giovannelli, Donato. Mon . "Living at the Extremes: Extremophiles and the Limits of Life in a Planetary Context". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2019.00780. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1532616.
@article{osti_1532616,
title = {Living at the Extremes: Extremophiles and the Limits of Life in a Planetary Context},
author = {Merino, Nancy and Aronson, Heidi S. and Bojanova, Diana P. and Feyhl-Buska, Jayme and Wong, Michael L. and Zhang, Shu and Giovannelli, Donato},
abstractNote = {Prokaryotic life has dominated most of the evolutionary history of our planet, evolving to occupy virtually all available environmental niches. Extremophiles, especially those thriving under multiple extremes, represent a key area of research for multiple disciplines, spanning from the study of adaptations to harsh conditions, to the biogeochemical cycling of elements. Extremophile research also has implications for origin of life studies and the search for life on other planetary and celestial bodies. In this article, we will review the current state of knowledge for the biospace in which life operates on Earth and will discuss it in a planetary context, highlighting knowledge gaps and areas of opportunity.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2019.00780},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = na,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Accumulation of Mn(II) in Deinococcus radiodurans Facilitates Gamma-Radiation Resistance
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