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Title: What would it take for renewably powered electrosynthesis to displace petrochemical processes?

Abstract

Electrocatalytic transformation of carbon dioxide (CO 2) and water into chemical feedstocks offers the potential to reduce carbon emissions by shifting the chemical industry away from fossil fuel dependence. We arrange a technoeconomic and carbon emission analysis of possible products, offering targets that would need to be met for economically compelling industrial implementation to be achieved. We also provide a comparison of the projected costs and CO 2 emissions across electrocatalytic, biocatalytic, and fossil fuel–derived production of chemical feedstocks. We discover that for electrosynthesis to become competitive with fossil fuel–derived feedstocks, electrical-to-chemical conversion efficiencies need to reach at least 60%, and renewable electricity prices need to fall below 4 cents per kilowatt-hour. We report on the possibility of combining electro- and biocatalytic processes, using sequential upgrading of CO 2 as a representative case. We describe the technical challenges and economic barriers to marketable electrosynthesized chemicals.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Stanford Univ., CA (United States); National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)
  4. TOTAL American Services Inc., Hopkinton, MA (United States)
  5. Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada
OSTI Identifier:
1532511
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515; SC0004993
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 364; Journal Issue: 6438; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

De Luna, Phil, Hahn, Christopher, Higgins, Drew, Jaffer, Shaffiq A., Jaramillo, Thomas F., and Sargent, Edward H. What would it take for renewably powered electrosynthesis to displace petrochemical processes?. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aav3506.
De Luna, Phil, Hahn, Christopher, Higgins, Drew, Jaffer, Shaffiq A., Jaramillo, Thomas F., & Sargent, Edward H. What would it take for renewably powered electrosynthesis to displace petrochemical processes?. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aav3506.
De Luna, Phil, Hahn, Christopher, Higgins, Drew, Jaffer, Shaffiq A., Jaramillo, Thomas F., and Sargent, Edward H. Fri . "What would it take for renewably powered electrosynthesis to displace petrochemical processes?". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aav3506.
@article{osti_1532511,
title = {What would it take for renewably powered electrosynthesis to displace petrochemical processes?},
author = {De Luna, Phil and Hahn, Christopher and Higgins, Drew and Jaffer, Shaffiq A. and Jaramillo, Thomas F. and Sargent, Edward H.},
abstractNote = {Electrocatalytic transformation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water into chemical feedstocks offers the potential to reduce carbon emissions by shifting the chemical industry away from fossil fuel dependence. We arrange a technoeconomic and carbon emission analysis of possible products, offering targets that would need to be met for economically compelling industrial implementation to be achieved. We also provide a comparison of the projected costs and CO2 emissions across electrocatalytic, biocatalytic, and fossil fuel–derived production of chemical feedstocks. We discover that for electrosynthesis to become competitive with fossil fuel–derived feedstocks, electrical-to-chemical conversion efficiencies need to reach at least 60%, and renewable electricity prices need to fall below 4 cents per kilowatt-hour. We report on the possibility of combining electro- and biocatalytic processes, using sequential upgrading of CO2 as a representative case. We describe the technical challenges and economic barriers to marketable electrosynthesized chemicals.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aav3506},
journal = {Science},
number = 6438,
volume = 364,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
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