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Title: Use of multiple tools including lead isotopes to decipher sources of ozone and reactive mercury to urban and rural locations in Nevada, USA

Abstract

Ambient air particulate matter (< 2.5 μm in diameter) samples were collected on two different filter types in 2014 and 2015 over 24 h periods and analyzed for reactive mercury (gaseous oxidized mercury + particulate bound mercury) concentrations and lead isotopes to determine sources of pollution to three sites in Nevada, USA. Two sites were located on the western edge of Nevada (Reno, urban, 1370 m and Peavine Peak, rural, high elevation, 2515 m); the third location was ~ 485 km east in rural Great Basin National Park, NV (2061 m). Reactive mercury samples were collected on cation exchange membranes simultaneously with lead samples, collected on Teflon membranes. Lead isotopic ratios have previously identified trans-Pacific lead sources based on the 206/207 and 208/207 lead ratios. Influence from trans-Pacific air masses was higher from March to June associated with long-range transport of pollutants. Spring months are well known for increased transport across the Pacific; however, fall months were also influenced by trans-Pacific air masses in this study. Western North American background ozone concentrations have been measured and modeled at 50 to 55 ppbv. Median ozone concentrations at both rural sites in Nevada were within this range. Sources leading to enhancements inmore » ozone of 2 to 18 ppbv above monthly medians in Nevada included emissions from Eurasia, regional urban centers, and global and regional wildfires, resulting in concentrations close to the USA air quality standard. At the high elevation locations, ozone was derived from pollutants being transported in the free troposphere that originate around the globe; however, Eurasia and Asia were dominant sources to the Western USA. Negative correlations between reactive mercury and percent Asian lead, Northern Eurasia and East Asia trajectories indicated reactive mercury concentrations at the two high elevation sites were produced by oxidants from local, regional, and marine boundary layer sources.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1532300
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1549456
Grant/Contract Number:  
[AC02-05CH11231]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 615; Journal Issue: C]; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Pierce, Ashley M., Gustin, Mae Sexauer, Christensen, John N., and Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela. Use of multiple tools including lead isotopes to decipher sources of ozone and reactive mercury to urban and rural locations in Nevada, USA. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.284.
Pierce, Ashley M., Gustin, Mae Sexauer, Christensen, John N., & Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela. Use of multiple tools including lead isotopes to decipher sources of ozone and reactive mercury to urban and rural locations in Nevada, USA. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.284.
Pierce, Ashley M., Gustin, Mae Sexauer, Christensen, John N., and Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela. Wed . "Use of multiple tools including lead isotopes to decipher sources of ozone and reactive mercury to urban and rural locations in Nevada, USA". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.284. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1532300.
@article{osti_1532300,
title = {Use of multiple tools including lead isotopes to decipher sources of ozone and reactive mercury to urban and rural locations in Nevada, USA},
author = {Pierce, Ashley M. and Gustin, Mae Sexauer and Christensen, John N. and Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela},
abstractNote = {Ambient air particulate matter (< 2.5 μm in diameter) samples were collected on two different filter types in 2014 and 2015 over 24 h periods and analyzed for reactive mercury (gaseous oxidized mercury + particulate bound mercury) concentrations and lead isotopes to determine sources of pollution to three sites in Nevada, USA. Two sites were located on the western edge of Nevada (Reno, urban, 1370 m and Peavine Peak, rural, high elevation, 2515 m); the third location was ~ 485 km east in rural Great Basin National Park, NV (2061 m). Reactive mercury samples were collected on cation exchange membranes simultaneously with lead samples, collected on Teflon membranes. Lead isotopic ratios have previously identified trans-Pacific lead sources based on the 206/207 and 208/207 lead ratios. Influence from trans-Pacific air masses was higher from March to June associated with long-range transport of pollutants. Spring months are well known for increased transport across the Pacific; however, fall months were also influenced by trans-Pacific air masses in this study. Western North American background ozone concentrations have been measured and modeled at 50 to 55 ppbv. Median ozone concentrations at both rural sites in Nevada were within this range. Sources leading to enhancements in ozone of 2 to 18 ppbv above monthly medians in Nevada included emissions from Eurasia, regional urban centers, and global and regional wildfires, resulting in concentrations close to the USA air quality standard. At the high elevation locations, ozone was derived from pollutants being transported in the free troposphere that originate around the globe; however, Eurasia and Asia were dominant sources to the Western USA. Negative correlations between reactive mercury and percent Asian lead, Northern Eurasia and East Asia trajectories indicated reactive mercury concentrations at the two high elevation sites were produced by oxidants from local, regional, and marine boundary layer sources.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.284},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = [C],
volume = [615],
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

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