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Title: Biogeochemical Equation of State for the Sea-Air Interface

Abstract

We have recently argued that marine interfacial surface tension must have a distinctive biogeography because it is mediated by fresh surfactant macromolecules released locally through the food web. Here we begin the process of quantification for associated climate flux implications. A low dimensionality (planar) equation of state is invoked at the global scale as our main analysis tool. For the reader’s convenience, fundamental surfactant physical chemistry principles are reviewed first, as they pertain to tangential forces that may alter oceanic eddy, ripple, and bubble fields. A model Prandtl (neutral) wind stress regime is defined for demonstration purposes. It is given the usual dependence on roughness, but then in turn on the tension reduction quantity known as surface pressure. This captures the main net influences of biology and detrital organics on global microlayer physics. Based on well-established surrogate species, tangent pressures are related to distributed ecodynamics as reflected by the current marine systems science knowledge base. Reductions to momentum and related heat-vapor exchange plus gas and salt transfer are estimated and placed on a coarse biogeographic grid. High primary production situations appear to strongly control all types of transfer, whether seasonally or regionally. Classic chemical oceanographic data on boundary state compositionmore » and behaviors are well reproduced, and there is a high degree of consistency with conventional micrometeorological wisdom. But although our initial best guesses are quite revealing, coordinated laboratory and field experiments will be required to confirm the broad hypotheses even partially. We note that if the concepts have large scale validity, they are super-Gaian. Biological control over key planetary climate-transfer modes may be accomplished through just a single rapidly renewed organic monolayer.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5]; ORCiD logo [4];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Chemistry Dept.
  3. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  5. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). International Arctic Research Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1531203
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmosphere (Basel)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmosphere (Basel); Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4433
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Elliott, Scott, Menzo, Zachary, Jayasinghe, Amadini, Allen, Heather C., Ogunro, Oluwaseun, Gibson, Georgina, Hoffman, Forrest, and Wingenter, Oliver. Biogeochemical Equation of State for the Sea-Air Interface. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/atmos10050230.
Elliott, Scott, Menzo, Zachary, Jayasinghe, Amadini, Allen, Heather C., Ogunro, Oluwaseun, Gibson, Georgina, Hoffman, Forrest, & Wingenter, Oliver. Biogeochemical Equation of State for the Sea-Air Interface. United States. doi:10.3390/atmos10050230.
Elliott, Scott, Menzo, Zachary, Jayasinghe, Amadini, Allen, Heather C., Ogunro, Oluwaseun, Gibson, Georgina, Hoffman, Forrest, and Wingenter, Oliver. Tue . "Biogeochemical Equation of State for the Sea-Air Interface". United States. doi:10.3390/atmos10050230. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1531203.
@article{osti_1531203,
title = {Biogeochemical Equation of State for the Sea-Air Interface},
author = {Elliott, Scott and Menzo, Zachary and Jayasinghe, Amadini and Allen, Heather C. and Ogunro, Oluwaseun and Gibson, Georgina and Hoffman, Forrest and Wingenter, Oliver},
abstractNote = {We have recently argued that marine interfacial surface tension must have a distinctive biogeography because it is mediated by fresh surfactant macromolecules released locally through the food web. Here we begin the process of quantification for associated climate flux implications. A low dimensionality (planar) equation of state is invoked at the global scale as our main analysis tool. For the reader’s convenience, fundamental surfactant physical chemistry principles are reviewed first, as they pertain to tangential forces that may alter oceanic eddy, ripple, and bubble fields. A model Prandtl (neutral) wind stress regime is defined for demonstration purposes. It is given the usual dependence on roughness, but then in turn on the tension reduction quantity known as surface pressure. This captures the main net influences of biology and detrital organics on global microlayer physics. Based on well-established surrogate species, tangent pressures are related to distributed ecodynamics as reflected by the current marine systems science knowledge base. Reductions to momentum and related heat-vapor exchange plus gas and salt transfer are estimated and placed on a coarse biogeographic grid. High primary production situations appear to strongly control all types of transfer, whether seasonally or regionally. Classic chemical oceanographic data on boundary state composition and behaviors are well reproduced, and there is a high degree of consistency with conventional micrometeorological wisdom. But although our initial best guesses are quite revealing, coordinated laboratory and field experiments will be required to confirm the broad hypotheses even partially. We note that if the concepts have large scale validity, they are super-Gaian. Biological control over key planetary climate-transfer modes may be accomplished through just a single rapidly renewed organic monolayer.},
doi = {10.3390/atmos10050230},
journal = {Atmosphere (Basel)},
number = 5,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

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