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Title: GRB 161219B/SN 2016jca: a powerful stellar collapse

Abstract

ABSTRACT We report observations and analysis of the nearby gamma-ray burst GRB 161219B (redshift z = 0.1475) and the associated Type Ic supernova (SN) 2016jca. GRB 161219B had an isotropic gamma-ray energy of ∼1.6 × 1050 erg. Its afterglow is likely refreshed at an epoch preceding the first photometric points (0.6 d), which slows down the decay rates. Combined analysis of the SN light curve and multiwavelength observations of the afterglow suggest that the GRB jet was broad during the afterglow phase (full opening angle ∼42° ± 3°). Our spectral series shows broad absorption lines typical of GRB supernovae (SNe), which testify to the presence of material with velocities up to ∼0.25c. The spectrum at 3.73 d allows for the very early identification of an SN associated with a GRB. Reproducing it requires a large photospheric velocity ($$35\, 000 \pm 7000$$ km s−1). The kinetic energy of the SN is estimated through models to be Ekin≈4 × 1052 erg in spherical symmetry. The ejected mass in the explosion was Mej≈6.5 ± 1.5 M⊙, much less than that of other GRB-SNe, demonstrating diversity among these events. The total amount of 56Ni in the explosion was 0.27 ± 0.05 M⊙. The observed spectra require the presence of freshly synthesized 56Ni at the highest velocities, at least three times more than a standard GRB-SN. We also find evidence for a decreasing 56Ni abundance as a function of decreasing velocity. This suggests that SN 2016jca was a highly aspherical explosion viewed close to on-axis, powered by a compact remnant. Applying a typical correction for asymmetry, the energy of SN 2016jca was ∼(1–3) × 1052 erg, confirming that most of the energy produced by GRB-SNe goes into the kinetic energy of the SN ejecta.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]; ORCiD logo [6];  [7];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [8];  [3];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [11] more »;  [11];  [15];  [16];  [17];  [18]; ORCiD logo [19];  [20];  [21];  [22] « less
  1. Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA, Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK
  2. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK, Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany
  3. INAF-OAS Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 93/3, I-40129 Bologna, Italy
  4. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
  5. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK, Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK
  6. Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF, UK
  7. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
  8. Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
  9. INAF, Astronomical Observatory of Catania, Via Santa Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania, Italy
  10. Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411, USA, Miller Senior Fellow, Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
  11. INAF, Brera Astronomical Observatory, Via Santa Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania, Italy
  12. Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 København ø, Denmark
  13. Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411, USA
  14. Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomia, E-18008 Granada, Spain
  15. Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Istanbul University Beyazid, Istanbul 34119, Turkey
  16. Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT, UK
  17. Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 20218, USA
  18. University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450, USA
  19. European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München, Germany
  20. Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583, Japan
  21. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan
  22. Special Astrophysical Observatory, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Karachai-Cherkessian Republic 369167, Russia
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1531036
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Journal Volume: 487 Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0035-8711
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ashall, C., Mazzali, P. A., Pian, E., Woosley, S. E., Palazzi, E., Prentice, S. J., Kobayashi, S., Holmbo, S., Levan, A., Perley, D., Stritzinger, M. D., Bufano, F., Filippenko, A. V., Melandri, A., Oates, S., Rossi, A., Selsing, J., Zheng, W., Castro-Tirado, A. J., Chincarini, G., D’Avanzo, P., De Pasquale, M., Emery, S., Fruchter, A. S., Hurley, K., Moller, P., Nomoto, K., Tanaka, M., and Valeev, A. F. GRB 161219B/SN 2016jca: a powerful stellar collapse. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1588.
Ashall, C., Mazzali, P. A., Pian, E., Woosley, S. E., Palazzi, E., Prentice, S. J., Kobayashi, S., Holmbo, S., Levan, A., Perley, D., Stritzinger, M. D., Bufano, F., Filippenko, A. V., Melandri, A., Oates, S., Rossi, A., Selsing, J., Zheng, W., Castro-Tirado, A. J., Chincarini, G., D’Avanzo, P., De Pasquale, M., Emery, S., Fruchter, A. S., Hurley, K., Moller, P., Nomoto, K., Tanaka, M., & Valeev, A. F. GRB 161219B/SN 2016jca: a powerful stellar collapse. United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1588.
Ashall, C., Mazzali, P. A., Pian, E., Woosley, S. E., Palazzi, E., Prentice, S. J., Kobayashi, S., Holmbo, S., Levan, A., Perley, D., Stritzinger, M. D., Bufano, F., Filippenko, A. V., Melandri, A., Oates, S., Rossi, A., Selsing, J., Zheng, W., Castro-Tirado, A. J., Chincarini, G., D’Avanzo, P., De Pasquale, M., Emery, S., Fruchter, A. S., Hurley, K., Moller, P., Nomoto, K., Tanaka, M., and Valeev, A. F. Mon . "GRB 161219B/SN 2016jca: a powerful stellar collapse". United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/mnras/stz1588.
@article{osti_1531036,
title = {GRB 161219B/SN 2016jca: a powerful stellar collapse},
author = {Ashall, C. and Mazzali, P. A. and Pian, E. and Woosley, S. E. and Palazzi, E. and Prentice, S. J. and Kobayashi, S. and Holmbo, S. and Levan, A. and Perley, D. and Stritzinger, M. D. and Bufano, F. and Filippenko, A. V. and Melandri, A. and Oates, S. and Rossi, A. and Selsing, J. and Zheng, W. and Castro-Tirado, A. J. and Chincarini, G. and D’Avanzo, P. and De Pasquale, M. and Emery, S. and Fruchter, A. S. and Hurley, K. and Moller, P. and Nomoto, K. and Tanaka, M. and Valeev, A. F.},
abstractNote = {ABSTRACT We report observations and analysis of the nearby gamma-ray burst GRB 161219B (redshift z = 0.1475) and the associated Type Ic supernova (SN) 2016jca. GRB 161219B had an isotropic gamma-ray energy of ∼1.6 × 1050 erg. Its afterglow is likely refreshed at an epoch preceding the first photometric points (0.6 d), which slows down the decay rates. Combined analysis of the SN light curve and multiwavelength observations of the afterglow suggest that the GRB jet was broad during the afterglow phase (full opening angle ∼42° ± 3°). Our spectral series shows broad absorption lines typical of GRB supernovae (SNe), which testify to the presence of material with velocities up to ∼0.25c. The spectrum at 3.73 d allows for the very early identification of an SN associated with a GRB. Reproducing it requires a large photospheric velocity ($35\, 000 \pm 7000$ km s−1). The kinetic energy of the SN is estimated through models to be Ekin≈4 × 1052 erg in spherical symmetry. The ejected mass in the explosion was Mej≈6.5 ± 1.5 M⊙, much less than that of other GRB-SNe, demonstrating diversity among these events. The total amount of 56Ni in the explosion was 0.27 ± 0.05 M⊙. The observed spectra require the presence of freshly synthesized 56Ni at the highest velocities, at least three times more than a standard GRB-SN. We also find evidence for a decreasing 56Ni abundance as a function of decreasing velocity. This suggests that SN 2016jca was a highly aspherical explosion viewed close to on-axis, powered by a compact remnant. Applying a typical correction for asymmetry, the energy of SN 2016jca was ∼(1–3) × 1052 erg, confirming that most of the energy produced by GRB-SNe goes into the kinetic energy of the SN ejecta.},
doi = {10.1093/mnras/stz1588},
journal = {Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
number = 4,
volume = 487,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}

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