skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Enhanced Aquatic Respiration Associated With Mixing of Clearwater Tributary and Turbid Amazon River Waters

Abstract

When water bodies with unique biogeochemical constituents mix together there is potential for diverse responses by aquatic microbial communities and associated ecosystem functions. Here we evaluate bulk respiration under varying mixtures of turbid Amazon River water and two lowland tributaries—the Tapajós and Xingu rivers—based on O2 drawdown in dark rotating incubation chambers. Experiments containing 5, 17, 33, and 50% tributary water mixed with Amazon River water were performed for the Tapajós and Xingu rivers at three different rotation velocities (0, 0.22, and 0.66 m s-1) during the falling water period. Pseudo first order reaction coefficients (k'), a measure of respiration potential, ranged from -0.15 to -1.10 d-1, corresponding to respiration rates from 1.0 to 8.1 mg O2 L d-1. k'-values consistently increased with the rate of chamber rotation, and also was generally higher in the tributary-mainstem mixtures compared to pure endmembers. For both the Tapajós and Xingu rivers, the 17% mixture of tributary water yielded maximal k'-values, which were up to 2.9 and 2.2 times greater than in the tributary endmembers, respectively. The 50% mixtures, on the other hand, did not result in large increases in k'. We hypothesize that enhanced respiration potential after mixing unique water is driven, inmore » part, by microbial priming effects that have been previously identified on a molecular level for these rivers. The results of this study suggest that there may be an optimal mixture for priming effects to occur in terms of the relative abundance of “priming” and “primed” substrates.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  2. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Univ. de São Paulo, Piracicaba (Brazil); Umeå Univ., Umeå (Sweden)
  3. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1530887
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1530746
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-140620
Journal ID: ISSN 2296-6463
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC0576RL01830; AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Earth Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2296-6463
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; respiration; aquatic; priming; carbon; mixing; Amazon, aquatic, bacteria, biogeochemistry, carbon cycling, continuum, decomposition, ecosystem, ecotone, global change, gradients, interface, metabolism, microbes, microbial, organic matter, oxygen, priming, respiration, river, terrestial aquatic interface

Citation Formats

Ward, Nicholas D., Sawakuchi, Henrique O., Richey, Jeffrey E., Keil, Richard G., and Bianchi, Thomas S. Enhanced Aquatic Respiration Associated With Mixing of Clearwater Tributary and Turbid Amazon River Waters. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3389/FEART.2019.00101.
Ward, Nicholas D., Sawakuchi, Henrique O., Richey, Jeffrey E., Keil, Richard G., & Bianchi, Thomas S. Enhanced Aquatic Respiration Associated With Mixing of Clearwater Tributary and Turbid Amazon River Waters. United States. doi:10.3389/FEART.2019.00101.
Ward, Nicholas D., Sawakuchi, Henrique O., Richey, Jeffrey E., Keil, Richard G., and Bianchi, Thomas S. Wed . "Enhanced Aquatic Respiration Associated With Mixing of Clearwater Tributary and Turbid Amazon River Waters". United States. doi:10.3389/FEART.2019.00101. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1530887.
@article{osti_1530887,
title = {Enhanced Aquatic Respiration Associated With Mixing of Clearwater Tributary and Turbid Amazon River Waters},
author = {Ward, Nicholas D. and Sawakuchi, Henrique O. and Richey, Jeffrey E. and Keil, Richard G. and Bianchi, Thomas S.},
abstractNote = {When water bodies with unique biogeochemical constituents mix together there is potential for diverse responses by aquatic microbial communities and associated ecosystem functions. Here we evaluate bulk respiration under varying mixtures of turbid Amazon River water and two lowland tributaries—the Tapajós and Xingu rivers—based on O2 drawdown in dark rotating incubation chambers. Experiments containing 5, 17, 33, and 50% tributary water mixed with Amazon River water were performed for the Tapajós and Xingu rivers at three different rotation velocities (0, 0.22, and 0.66 m s-1) during the falling water period. Pseudo first order reaction coefficients (k'), a measure of respiration potential, ranged from -0.15 to -1.10 d-1, corresponding to respiration rates from 1.0 to 8.1 mg O2 L d-1. k'-values consistently increased with the rate of chamber rotation, and also was generally higher in the tributary-mainstem mixtures compared to pure endmembers. For both the Tapajós and Xingu rivers, the 17% mixture of tributary water yielded maximal k'-values, which were up to 2.9 and 2.2 times greater than in the tributary endmembers, respectively. The 50% mixtures, on the other hand, did not result in large increases in k'. We hypothesize that enhanced respiration potential after mixing unique water is driven, in part, by microbial priming effects that have been previously identified on a molecular level for these rivers. The results of this study suggest that there may be an optimal mixture for priming effects to occur in terms of the relative abundance of “priming” and “primed” substrates.},
doi = {10.3389/FEART.2019.00101},
journal = {Frontiers in Earth Science},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: (A) Incubation experiments were performed using water collected from the Amazon River mainstem at Óbidos and Almeirim and in two clearwater tributaries—the Tapajós and Xingu rivers. (B) Water collected in the Amazon River mainstem was also mixed with water from the Tapajós (top) and Xingu rivers (bottom) onmore » the days pictured. Pseudo first order reaction coefficients (k′) were measured for these different mixtures at three rotational velocities for the (C) Tapajós and (D) Xingu rivers and used to calculate respiration rates (E,F). Error bars represent ± 1 standard deviation calculated by propagating uncertainty in our calculations and variability between replicates (n = 2 for rotating chambers and n = 1 for stationary chamber).« less

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Plumbing the Global Carbon Cycle: Integrating Inland Waters into the Terrestrial Carbon Budget
journal, February 2007


Seasonal and spatial variability of dissolved organic matter composition in the lower Amazon River
journal, November 2016


Source to sink: Evolution of lignin composition in the Madre de Dios River system with connection to the Amazon basin and offshore: Lignin Evolution in Amazon
journal, May 2016

  • Feng, Xiaojuan; Feakins, Sarah J.; Liu, Zongguang
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 121, Issue 5
  • DOI: 10.1002/2016jg003323

Diversity and dynamics of free-living and particle-associated Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria in relation to phytoplankton and zooplankton communities
journal, June 2011


Fate of the Amazon River dissolved organic matter in the tropical Atlantic Ocean: DOM IN THE AMAZON RIVER-OCEAN CONTINUUM
journal, May 2015

  • Medeiros, Patricia M.; Seidel, Michael; Ward, Nicholas D.
  • Global Biogeochemical Cycles, Vol. 29, Issue 5
  • DOI: 10.1002/2015GB005115

Organic Carbon: Oxidation and Transport in the Amazon River
journal, March 1980


Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic inventories of the lower Amazon River, May 2011
journal, September 2015


Impact of Wetland Decline on Decreasing Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations along the Mississippi River Continuum
journal, January 2017


Degradation of terrestrially derived macromolecules in the Amazon River
journal, May 2013

  • Ward, Nicholas D.; Keil, Richard G.; Medeiros, Patricia M.
  • Nature Geoscience, Vol. 6, Issue 7
  • DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1817

Marine microbial community responses related to wetland carbon mobilization in the coastal zone: Coastal microbial dynamics
journal, December 2018

  • Ward, Nicholas D.; Morrison, Elise S.; Liu, Yina
  • Limnology and Oceanography Letters, Vol. 4, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1002/lol2.10101

Where Carbon Goes When Water Flows: Carbon Cycling across the Aquatic Continuum
journal, January 2017

  • Ward, Nicholas D.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Medeiros, Patricia M.
  • Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol. 4
  • DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00007

Organic carbon decomposition rates controlled by water retention time across inland waters
journal, May 2016

  • Catalán, Núria; Marcé, Rafael; Kothawala, Dolly N.
  • Nature Geoscience, Vol. 9, Issue 7
  • DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2720

Negative Priming Effect on Organic Matter Mineralisation in NE Atlantic Slope Sediments
journal, June 2013


Simultaneous quantification of aquatic ecosystem metabolism and reaeration using a Bayesian statistical model of oxygen dynamics
journal, March 2010

  • Holtgrieve, Gordon W.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Branch, Trevor A.
  • Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 55, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.4319/lo.2010.55.3.1047

The River Continuum Concept
journal, January 1980

  • Vannote, Robin L.; Minshall, G. Wayne; Cummins, Kenneth W.
  • Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Vol. 37, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1139/f80-017

The role of terrestrially derived organic carbon in the coastal ocean: A changing paradigm and the priming effect
journal, November 2011


Molecular Signatures of Biogeochemical Transformations in Dissolved Organic Matter from Ten World Rivers
journal, September 2016


Bacterial Biogeography across the Amazon River-Ocean Continuum
journal, May 2017


Carbon Dioxide Emissions along the Lower Amazon River
journal, March 2017

  • Sawakuchi, Henrique O.; Neu, Vania; Ward, Nicholas D.
  • Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol. 4
  • DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00076

The compositional evolution of dissolved and particulate organic matter along the lower Amazon River—Óbidos to the ocean
journal, December 2015


Patterns of Bacterial and Archaeal Gene Expression through the Lower Amazon River
journal, August 2017

  • Satinsky, Brandon M.; Smith, Christa B.; Sharma, Shalabh
  • Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol. 4
  • DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00253

Sorptive fractionation of dissolved organic nitrogen and amino acids onto fine sediments within the Amazon Basin
journal, November 2001

  • Aufdenkampe, Anthony K.; Hedges, John I.; Richey, Jeffery E.
  • Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 46, Issue 8
  • DOI: 10.4319/lo.2001.46.8.1921

Oxygen depletion in the upper reach of the Pearl River estuary during a winter drought
journal, November 2006


Global carbon dioxide emissions from inland waters
journal, November 2013

  • Raymond, Peter A.; Hartmann, Jens; Lauerwald, Ronny
  • Nature, Vol. 503, Issue 7476
  • DOI: 10.1038/nature12760

Molecular-level changes of dissolved organic matter along the Amazon River-to-ocean continuum
journal, December 2015


Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property
journal, October 2011

  • Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Torn, Margaret S.; Abiven, Samuel
  • Nature, Vol. 478, Issue 7367
  • DOI: 10.1038/nature10386

Velocity-amplified microbial respiration rates in the lower Amazon River: Amazon River respiration
journal, February 2018

  • Ward, Nicholas D.; Sawakuchi, Henrique O.; Neu, Vania
  • Limnology and Oceanography Letters, Vol. 3, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1002/lol2.10062

Interactive effects on organic matter processing from soils to the ocean: are priming effects relevant in aquatic ecosystems?
journal, June 2018


Positive priming of terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter in a freshwater microcosm system: Priming of Dissolved Organic Matter
journal, July 2015

  • Bianchi, Thomas S.; Thornton, Daniel C. O.; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.
  • Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 42, Issue 13
  • DOI: 10.1002/2015GL064765

Absence of a priming effect on dissolved organic carbon degradation in lake water: Absence of priming in lake water
journal, January 2015

  • Catalán, Núria; Kellerman, Anne M.; Peter, Hannes
  • Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 60, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1002/lno.10016

The reactivity of plant-derived organic matter and the potential importance of priming effects along the lower Amazon River: ORGANIC MATTER REACTIVITY IN THE AMAZON
journal, June 2016

  • Ward, Nicholas D.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Sawakuchi, Henrique O.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 121, Issue 6
  • DOI: 10.1002/2016JG003342

High rates of daytime respiration in three streams: Use of δ 18 O O2 and O 2 to model diel ecosystem metabolism
journal, April 2014


    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.