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Title: Progress in ultrahigh energy resolution EELS

Abstract

Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the electron microscope has progressed remarkably in the last five years. Advances in monochromator and spectrometer design have improved the energy resolution attainable in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to 4.2 meV, and new applications of ultrahigh energy resolution EELS have not lagged behind. They include vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope, a field that did not exist 5 years ago but has now grown very substantially. Notable examples include vibrational mapping with about 1 nm spatial resolution, analyzing the momentum dependence of vibrational states in very small volumes, determining the local temperature of the sample from the ratio of energy gains to energy losses, detecting hydrogen and analyzing its bonding, probing radiation-sensitive materials with minimized damage by aloof spectroscopy and leap-frog scanning, and identifying biological molecules with different isotopic substitutions. As a result, we review the instrumentation advances, provide a summary of key applications, and chart likely future directions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Nion R&D, Kirkland, WA (United States); Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)
  2. Nion R&D, Kirkland, WA (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1530104
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ultramicroscopy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 203; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0304-3991
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Krivanek, Ondrej L., Dellby, Niklas, Hachtel, Jordan A., Idrobo, Juan -C., Hotz, M. T., Plotkin-Swing, Ben, Bacon, Neil J., Bleloch, Andrew L., Corbin, George J., Hoffman, Matthew V., Meyer, Chris E., and Lovejoy, Tracy C. Progress in ultrahigh energy resolution EELS. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.12.006.
Krivanek, Ondrej L., Dellby, Niklas, Hachtel, Jordan A., Idrobo, Juan -C., Hotz, M. T., Plotkin-Swing, Ben, Bacon, Neil J., Bleloch, Andrew L., Corbin, George J., Hoffman, Matthew V., Meyer, Chris E., & Lovejoy, Tracy C. Progress in ultrahigh energy resolution EELS. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.12.006.
Krivanek, Ondrej L., Dellby, Niklas, Hachtel, Jordan A., Idrobo, Juan -C., Hotz, M. T., Plotkin-Swing, Ben, Bacon, Neil J., Bleloch, Andrew L., Corbin, George J., Hoffman, Matthew V., Meyer, Chris E., and Lovejoy, Tracy C. Tue . "Progress in ultrahigh energy resolution EELS". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.12.006.
@article{osti_1530104,
title = {Progress in ultrahigh energy resolution EELS},
author = {Krivanek, Ondrej L. and Dellby, Niklas and Hachtel, Jordan A. and Idrobo, Juan -C. and Hotz, M. T. and Plotkin-Swing, Ben and Bacon, Neil J. and Bleloch, Andrew L. and Corbin, George J. and Hoffman, Matthew V. and Meyer, Chris E. and Lovejoy, Tracy C.},
abstractNote = {Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in the electron microscope has progressed remarkably in the last five years. Advances in monochromator and spectrometer design have improved the energy resolution attainable in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to 4.2 meV, and new applications of ultrahigh energy resolution EELS have not lagged behind. They include vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope, a field that did not exist 5 years ago but has now grown very substantially. Notable examples include vibrational mapping with about 1 nm spatial resolution, analyzing the momentum dependence of vibrational states in very small volumes, determining the local temperature of the sample from the ratio of energy gains to energy losses, detecting hydrogen and analyzing its bonding, probing radiation-sensitive materials with minimized damage by aloof spectroscopy and leap-frog scanning, and identifying biological molecules with different isotopic substitutions. As a result, we review the instrumentation advances, provide a summary of key applications, and chart likely future directions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.12.006},
journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
number = C,
volume = 203,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}

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