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Title: Ionization-induced thermally activated defect-annealing process in SiC

Abstract

Ionizing events can lead to panoply of irradiation effects, and in silicon carbide (SiC), they drastically modify the defect production rate or the initial density. To better comprehend this phenomenon, 6H-SiC single crystals were first predamaged using low-velocity 100-keV Fe + ions at three fluences in the range of 10 14cm -2 to induce three different initial disorder levels peaking at values between ~0.8 and 1 (1 corresponding to full amorphization). Crystals were then submitted to swift heavy ion irradiation in the 10 13cm -2 fluence range at both low (~100 K) and high (~770 K) temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions revealed that swift ions allow annealing part of the initial damage, the recovery efficiency increasing with the irradiation temperature and reaching 75% in initially severely disordered crystals. This temperature effect has been qualitatively predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. Transmission electron microscopy allowed imaging both the recovery and the difference in the microstructure of the layers irradiated at low or high temperature. Recovery cross sections are discovered to lie in the range of a few square nanometers, consistent with previously reported values. A scenario for a general, two-step annealing mechanism referred to as an ionization-activated, thermally assisted defect-annealingmore » (IATADA) process is proposed. This mechanism rationalizes the diverse descriptions reported so far in the literature.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)
  2. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Caen (France)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1530075
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2475-9953
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY

Citation Formats

Debelle, Aurélien, Thomé, Lionel, Monnet, Isabelle, Garrido, Frédérico, Pakarinen, Olli H., and Weber, William J. Ionization-induced thermally activated defect-annealing process in SiC. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.3.063609.
Debelle, Aurélien, Thomé, Lionel, Monnet, Isabelle, Garrido, Frédérico, Pakarinen, Olli H., & Weber, William J. Ionization-induced thermally activated defect-annealing process in SiC. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.3.063609.
Debelle, Aurélien, Thomé, Lionel, Monnet, Isabelle, Garrido, Frédérico, Pakarinen, Olli H., and Weber, William J. Thu . "Ionization-induced thermally activated defect-annealing process in SiC". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.3.063609.
@article{osti_1530075,
title = {Ionization-induced thermally activated defect-annealing process in SiC},
author = {Debelle, Aurélien and Thomé, Lionel and Monnet, Isabelle and Garrido, Frédérico and Pakarinen, Olli H. and Weber, William J.},
abstractNote = {Ionizing events can lead to panoply of irradiation effects, and in silicon carbide (SiC), they drastically modify the defect production rate or the initial density. To better comprehend this phenomenon, 6H-SiC single crystals were first predamaged using low-velocity 100-keV Fe+ ions at three fluences in the range of 1014cm-2 to induce three different initial disorder levels peaking at values between ~0.8 and 1 (1 corresponding to full amorphization). Crystals were then submitted to swift heavy ion irradiation in the 1013cm-2 fluence range at both low (~100 K) and high (~770 K) temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling conditions revealed that swift ions allow annealing part of the initial damage, the recovery efficiency increasing with the irradiation temperature and reaching 75% in initially severely disordered crystals. This temperature effect has been qualitatively predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. Transmission electron microscopy allowed imaging both the recovery and the difference in the microstructure of the layers irradiated at low or high temperature. Recovery cross sections are discovered to lie in the range of a few square nanometers, consistent with previously reported values. A scenario for a general, two-step annealing mechanism referred to as an ionization-activated, thermally assisted defect-annealing (IATADA) process is proposed. This mechanism rationalizes the diverse descriptions reported so far in the literature.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.3.063609},
journal = {Physical Review Materials},
number = 6,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}

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This content will become publicly available on June 20, 2020
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