skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Drought Conditions Maximize the Impact of High‐Frequency Flow Variations on Thermal Regimes and Biogeochemical Function in the Hyporheic Zone

Abstract

Anthropogenic activities, such as dam operations, often induce larger and more frequent stage fluctuations than those occurring in natural rivers. However, the long-term impact of such flow variations on thermal and biogeochemical dynamics of the associated hyporheic zone (HZ) is poorly understood. A heterogeneous, two-dimensional thermo-hydro-biogeochemical model revealed an important interaction between high-frequency flow variations and watershed-scale hydrology. High-frequency stage fluctuations had their strongest thermal and biogeochemical impacts when the mean river stage was low during fall and winter. An abnormally thin snowpack in 2015, however, created a low river stage during summer and early fall, whereby high-frequency stage fluctuations caused the HZ to be warmer than usual. Furthermore, this study provided the scientific basis to assess the potential ecological consequences of the high-frequency flow variations in a regulated river, as well as guidance on how to maximize the potential benefits—or minimize the drawbacks—of river regulation to river ecosystems.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1529988
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1476382
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123922
Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830; BER SBR SFA; AC05‐76RL01830; AC02‐05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; hyporheic exchange; flow variations; biogeochemistry; heat transport

Citation Formats

Song, Xuehang, Chen, Xingyuan, Stegen, James C., Hammond, Glenn, Song, Hyun ‐Seob, Dai, Heng, Graham, Emily B., and Zachara, John M. Drought Conditions Maximize the Impact of High‐Frequency Flow Variations on Thermal Regimes and Biogeochemical Function in the Hyporheic Zone. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1029/2018WR022586.
Song, Xuehang, Chen, Xingyuan, Stegen, James C., Hammond, Glenn, Song, Hyun ‐Seob, Dai, Heng, Graham, Emily B., & Zachara, John M. Drought Conditions Maximize the Impact of High‐Frequency Flow Variations on Thermal Regimes and Biogeochemical Function in the Hyporheic Zone. United States. doi:10.1029/2018WR022586.
Song, Xuehang, Chen, Xingyuan, Stegen, James C., Hammond, Glenn, Song, Hyun ‐Seob, Dai, Heng, Graham, Emily B., and Zachara, John M. Wed . "Drought Conditions Maximize the Impact of High‐Frequency Flow Variations on Thermal Regimes and Biogeochemical Function in the Hyporheic Zone". United States. doi:10.1029/2018WR022586. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1529988.
@article{osti_1529988,
title = {Drought Conditions Maximize the Impact of High‐Frequency Flow Variations on Thermal Regimes and Biogeochemical Function in the Hyporheic Zone},
author = {Song, Xuehang and Chen, Xingyuan and Stegen, James C. and Hammond, Glenn and Song, Hyun ‐Seob and Dai, Heng and Graham, Emily B. and Zachara, John M.},
abstractNote = {Anthropogenic activities, such as dam operations, often induce larger and more frequent stage fluctuations than those occurring in natural rivers. However, the long-term impact of such flow variations on thermal and biogeochemical dynamics of the associated hyporheic zone (HZ) is poorly understood. A heterogeneous, two-dimensional thermo-hydro-biogeochemical model revealed an important interaction between high-frequency flow variations and watershed-scale hydrology. High-frequency stage fluctuations had their strongest thermal and biogeochemical impacts when the mean river stage was low during fall and winter. An abnormally thin snowpack in 2015, however, created a low river stage during summer and early fall, whereby high-frequency stage fluctuations caused the HZ to be warmer than usual. Furthermore, this study provided the scientific basis to assess the potential ecological consequences of the high-frequency flow variations in a regulated river, as well as guidance on how to maximize the potential benefits—or minimize the drawbacks—of river regulation to river ecosystems.},
doi = {10.1029/2018WR022586},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = 10,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 7 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: