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Title: Crossing Multiple Gray Zones in the Transition from Mesoscale to Microscale Simulation over Complex Terrain

Abstract

This review paper explores the field of mesoscale to microscale modeling over complex terrain as it traverses multiple so-called gray zones. In an attempt to bridge the gap between previous large-scale and small-scale modeling efforts, atmospheric simulations are being run at an unprecedented range of resolutions. The gray zone is the range of grid resolutions where particular features are neither subgrid nor fully resolved, but rather are partially resolved. The definition of a gray zone depends strongly on the feature being represented and its relationship to the model resolution. This paper explores three gray zones relevant to simulations over complex terrain: turbulence, convection, and topography. Taken together, these may be referred to as the gray continuum. The focus is on horizontal grid resolutions from ∼10 km to ∼10 m. In each case, the challenges are presented together with recent progress in the literature. A common theme is to address cross-scale interaction and scale-awareness in parameterization schemes. How numerical models are designed to cross these gray zones is critical to complex terrain applications in numerical weather prediction, wind resource forecasting, and regional climate modeling, among others.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Federal Inst. of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland)
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  4. Federal Inst. of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach (Germany)
  5. Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1529696
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1529180
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-764800
Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4433; ATMOCZ; 954708
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Atmosphere (Basel)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmosphere (Basel); Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4433
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
mesoscale modeling; microscale modeling; gray zone; terra incognita; complex terrain

Citation Formats

Chow, Fotini, Schär, Christoph, Ban, Nikolina, Lundquist, Katherine, Schlemmer, Linda, and Shi, Xiaoming. Crossing Multiple Gray Zones in the Transition from Mesoscale to Microscale Simulation over Complex Terrain. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/atmos10050274.
Chow, Fotini, Schär, Christoph, Ban, Nikolina, Lundquist, Katherine, Schlemmer, Linda, & Shi, Xiaoming. Crossing Multiple Gray Zones in the Transition from Mesoscale to Microscale Simulation over Complex Terrain. United States. doi:10.3390/atmos10050274.
Chow, Fotini, Schär, Christoph, Ban, Nikolina, Lundquist, Katherine, Schlemmer, Linda, and Shi, Xiaoming. Tue . "Crossing Multiple Gray Zones in the Transition from Mesoscale to Microscale Simulation over Complex Terrain". United States. doi:10.3390/atmos10050274.
@article{osti_1529696,
title = {Crossing Multiple Gray Zones in the Transition from Mesoscale to Microscale Simulation over Complex Terrain},
author = {Chow, Fotini and Schär, Christoph and Ban, Nikolina and Lundquist, Katherine and Schlemmer, Linda and Shi, Xiaoming},
abstractNote = {This review paper explores the field of mesoscale to microscale modeling over complex terrain as it traverses multiple so-called gray zones. In an attempt to bridge the gap between previous large-scale and small-scale modeling efforts, atmospheric simulations are being run at an unprecedented range of resolutions. The gray zone is the range of grid resolutions where particular features are neither subgrid nor fully resolved, but rather are partially resolved. The definition of a gray zone depends strongly on the feature being represented and its relationship to the model resolution. This paper explores three gray zones relevant to simulations over complex terrain: turbulence, convection, and topography. Taken together, these may be referred to as the gray continuum. The focus is on horizontal grid resolutions from ∼10 km to ∼10 m. In each case, the challenges are presented together with recent progress in the literature. A common theme is to address cross-scale interaction and scale-awareness in parameterization schemes. How numerical models are designed to cross these gray zones is critical to complex terrain applications in numerical weather prediction, wind resource forecasting, and regional climate modeling, among others.},
doi = {10.3390/atmos10050274},
journal = {Atmosphere (Basel)},
number = 5,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.3390/atmos10050274

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