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Title: Aerobic respiration of mineral-bound organic carbon in a soil

Abstract

Associations with minerals can potentially augment soil organic carbon (SOC) stability by reducing the bioavailability and degradation of SOC. Yet, few studies have directly measured aerobic respiration of mineral-bound SOC. In this study, we investigated the microbial aerobic respiration and bioavailability of ferrihydrite-sorbed glucose (Fh-GLU) and ferrihydrite-sorbed formic acid (Fh-FA) by adding 13C-labeled compounds to a soil. During an 11-day incubation, 30.2% of free, non-Fh-sorbed glucose (GLU) and 61.8% of free formic acid (FA) were respired, whereas 4.2% and 27.9% of Fh-GLU and Fh-FA were respired, respectively. Our results revealed that Fh-bound GLU/FA had lower bioavailability compared to free organic compounds. Associations with Fh led to greater inhibition in the bioavailability of GLU than that for FA. The priming effects of added compounds on the respiration of native SOC were decreased by their association with Fh. Our results demonstrated that the bioavailability and priming effect of organic compounds depend on their interactions with minerals.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1527296
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-774775
Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697; 965236
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 651; Journal Issue: P1; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Organic carbon; mineral; respiration; iron oxide

Citation Formats

Adhikari, Dinesh, Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M., Wordofa, Dawit N., Verburg, Paul, Poulson, Simon R., and Yang, Yu. Aerobic respiration of mineral-bound organic carbon in a soil. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.271.
Adhikari, Dinesh, Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M., Wordofa, Dawit N., Verburg, Paul, Poulson, Simon R., & Yang, Yu. Aerobic respiration of mineral-bound organic carbon in a soil. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.271.
Adhikari, Dinesh, Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M., Wordofa, Dawit N., Verburg, Paul, Poulson, Simon R., and Yang, Yu. Fri . "Aerobic respiration of mineral-bound organic carbon in a soil". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.271. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1527296.
@article{osti_1527296,
title = {Aerobic respiration of mineral-bound organic carbon in a soil},
author = {Adhikari, Dinesh and Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M. and Wordofa, Dawit N. and Verburg, Paul and Poulson, Simon R. and Yang, Yu},
abstractNote = {Associations with minerals can potentially augment soil organic carbon (SOC) stability by reducing the bioavailability and degradation of SOC. Yet, few studies have directly measured aerobic respiration of mineral-bound SOC. In this study, we investigated the microbial aerobic respiration and bioavailability of ferrihydrite-sorbed glucose (Fh-GLU) and ferrihydrite-sorbed formic acid (Fh-FA) by adding 13C-labeled compounds to a soil. During an 11-day incubation, 30.2% of free, non-Fh-sorbed glucose (GLU) and 61.8% of free formic acid (FA) were respired, whereas 4.2% and 27.9% of Fh-GLU and Fh-FA were respired, respectively. Our results revealed that Fh-bound GLU/FA had lower bioavailability compared to free organic compounds. Associations with Fh led to greater inhibition in the bioavailability of GLU than that for FA. The priming effects of added compounds on the respiration of native SOC were decreased by their association with Fh. Our results demonstrated that the bioavailability and priming effect of organic compounds depend on their interactions with minerals.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.271},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = P1,
volume = 651,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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