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Title: Biogeochemical fate of ferrihydrite-model organic compound complexes during anaerobic microbial reduction

Abstract

Associations of organic carbon (OC) with iron (Fe) oxide minerals play a vital role in regulating the stability of OC in soil environments. Knowledge about the fate and stability of Fe-OC complexes is impaired by the heterogeneity of OC. Additional biogeochemical variables in soil environments, such as redox conditions and microbes, further increase complexity in understanding the stability of mineral-associated soil OC. This study investigated the fate and stability of model organic compounds, including glucose (GL), glucosamine (GN), tyrosine (TN), benzoquinone (BQ), amylose (AM), and alginate (AL), complexed with an Fe oxide mineral, ferrihydrite (Fh), during microbial reduction. During a 25-d anaerobic incubation with Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, the reduction of Fe followed the order of Fh-BQ>Fh-GL>Fh-GN>Fh-TN>Fh-AL>Fh-AM. In terms of OC released during the anaerobic incubation, Fh-GN complexes released the highest amount of OC while Fh-AM complexes released the lowest. Organic carbon regulated the reduction of Fe by acting as an electron shuttle, affecting microbial activities, and associating with Fh. Benzoquinone had the highest electron accepting capacity, but potentially can inhibit microbial activity. These results provide insights into the roles of different organic functional groups in regulating Fe reduction and the stability of Fh-bound OC under anaerobic conditions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [4];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)
  2. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  4. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1527276
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-773257
Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697; 965250
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344; SC0014275
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 668; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Ferrihydrite; Microbial reduction; Organic carbon; Quinone; Electron transport

Citation Formats

Wordofa, Dawit N., Adhikari, Dinesh, Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M., Zhao, Qian, Poulson, Simon R., Tang, Yuanzhi, and Yang, Yu. Biogeochemical fate of ferrihydrite-model organic compound complexes during anaerobic microbial reduction. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.441.
Wordofa, Dawit N., Adhikari, Dinesh, Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M., Zhao, Qian, Poulson, Simon R., Tang, Yuanzhi, & Yang, Yu. Biogeochemical fate of ferrihydrite-model organic compound complexes during anaerobic microbial reduction. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.441.
Wordofa, Dawit N., Adhikari, Dinesh, Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M., Zhao, Qian, Poulson, Simon R., Tang, Yuanzhi, and Yang, Yu. Fri . "Biogeochemical fate of ferrihydrite-model organic compound complexes during anaerobic microbial reduction". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.441.
@article{osti_1527276,
title = {Biogeochemical fate of ferrihydrite-model organic compound complexes during anaerobic microbial reduction},
author = {Wordofa, Dawit N. and Adhikari, Dinesh and Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah M. and Zhao, Qian and Poulson, Simon R. and Tang, Yuanzhi and Yang, Yu},
abstractNote = {Associations of organic carbon (OC) with iron (Fe) oxide minerals play a vital role in regulating the stability of OC in soil environments. Knowledge about the fate and stability of Fe-OC complexes is impaired by the heterogeneity of OC. Additional biogeochemical variables in soil environments, such as redox conditions and microbes, further increase complexity in understanding the stability of mineral-associated soil OC. This study investigated the fate and stability of model organic compounds, including glucose (GL), glucosamine (GN), tyrosine (TN), benzoquinone (BQ), amylose (AM), and alginate (AL), complexed with an Fe oxide mineral, ferrihydrite (Fh), during microbial reduction. During a 25-d anaerobic incubation with Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, the reduction of Fe followed the order of Fh-BQ>Fh-GL>Fh-GN>Fh-TN>Fh-AL>Fh-AM. In terms of OC released during the anaerobic incubation, Fh-GN complexes released the highest amount of OC while Fh-AM complexes released the lowest. Organic carbon regulated the reduction of Fe by acting as an electron shuttle, affecting microbial activities, and associating with Fh. Benzoquinone had the highest electron accepting capacity, but potentially can inhibit microbial activity. These results provide insights into the roles of different organic functional groups in regulating Fe reduction and the stability of Fh-bound OC under anaerobic conditions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.441},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = C,
volume = 668,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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This content will become publicly available on March 1, 2020
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