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Title: How to make Progress with North Korea Now

Abstract

In early 2017 the United States should have taken up the Chinese and Russian-backed proposal to suspend United States – South Korean joint military exercises in exchange for suspension of North Korean nuclear and missile tests. South Korea was signaling that it would support this proposal. That was before North Korea tested inter-continental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), capable of reaching anywhere in the U.S., and an advanced nuclear explosive, some ten times more powerful than those the U.S. used against Japan in WWII. The Trump administration brushed aside that original international proposal. The Singapore Summit, however, has put just such a suspension-for-suspension agreement in place. A little late, but much better than never.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development (NA-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1525315
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002534
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2018; Journal ID: ISSN 0096-3402
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION

Citation Formats

Goldston, Robert. How to make Progress with North Korea Now. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Goldston, Robert. How to make Progress with North Korea Now. United States.
Goldston, Robert. Fri . "How to make Progress with North Korea Now". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1525315.
@article{osti_1525315,
title = {How to make Progress with North Korea Now},
author = {Goldston, Robert},
abstractNote = {In early 2017 the United States should have taken up the Chinese and Russian-backed proposal to suspend United States – South Korean joint military exercises in exchange for suspension of North Korean nuclear and missile tests. South Korea was signaling that it would support this proposal. That was before North Korea tested inter-continental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), capable of reaching anywhere in the U.S., and an advanced nuclear explosive, some ten times more powerful than those the U.S. used against Japan in WWII. The Trump administration brushed aside that original international proposal. The Singapore Summit, however, has put just such a suspension-for-suspension agreement in place. A little late, but much better than never.},
doi = {},
journal = {Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists},
number = ,
volume = 2018,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
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