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Title: Interface and embedded joint methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products [Two methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products]

Abstract

Two computational approaches are proposed in the paper to model dynamic fracture opening by explosive products. The first method assumes that the fractures may be modeled using flow elements embedded along the mesh lines. This method models crack opening in a straightforward way by splitting the nodes of the computational grid. It can account for crack branching; however, the crack directions are constrained by existing mesh faces, which may lead to mesh dependence. Also, the stress in flow elements is calculated explicitly separate from the surrounding solid elements that can impose additional limits on the time step stability condition for explicit integration. The second approach uses embedded flow elements to model the cracks. Typical thickness of the cracks is much smaller than the element size. Therefore, gas pressure in the cracks is assumed to be in stress equilibrium with the element stress. To achieve this, the crack thickness and the state of the gas is updated simultaneously with the state of the solid element which contains the crack. Therefore, the time step is controlled by the explicit solver applied for the solid and does not depend on the thickness of the crack. In conclusion, the main disadvantage of the secondmore » approach is due to the complexity of modeling multiple intersecting cracks, which go through the same element. We discuss the areas of possible applications of these 2 methods and the ways to improve and enhance them for future practical applications.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1513836
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-740316
Journal ID: ISSN 0363-9061; 892711
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 0363-9061
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; dynamic fracture; gas expansion into cracks; jointed rock

Citation Formats

Vorobiev, Oleg Y., Settgast, Randolph, and Morris, Joseph P. Interface and embedded joint methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products [Two methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products]. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/nag.2803.
Vorobiev, Oleg Y., Settgast, Randolph, & Morris, Joseph P. Interface and embedded joint methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products [Two methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products]. United States. doi:10.1002/nag.2803.
Vorobiev, Oleg Y., Settgast, Randolph, and Morris, Joseph P. Tue . "Interface and embedded joint methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products [Two methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products]". United States. doi:10.1002/nag.2803. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1513836.
@article{osti_1513836,
title = {Interface and embedded joint methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products [Two methods for modeling dynamic fracture opening by explosive products]},
author = {Vorobiev, Oleg Y. and Settgast, Randolph and Morris, Joseph P.},
abstractNote = {Two computational approaches are proposed in the paper to model dynamic fracture opening by explosive products. The first method assumes that the fractures may be modeled using flow elements embedded along the mesh lines. This method models crack opening in a straightforward way by splitting the nodes of the computational grid. It can account for crack branching; however, the crack directions are constrained by existing mesh faces, which may lead to mesh dependence. Also, the stress in flow elements is calculated explicitly separate from the surrounding solid elements that can impose additional limits on the time step stability condition for explicit integration. The second approach uses embedded flow elements to model the cracks. Typical thickness of the cracks is much smaller than the element size. Therefore, gas pressure in the cracks is assumed to be in stress equilibrium with the element stress. To achieve this, the crack thickness and the state of the gas is updated simultaneously with the state of the solid element which contains the crack. Therefore, the time step is controlled by the explicit solver applied for the solid and does not depend on the thickness of the crack. In conclusion, the main disadvantage of the second approach is due to the complexity of modeling multiple intersecting cracks, which go through the same element. We discuss the areas of possible applications of these 2 methods and the ways to improve and enhance them for future practical applications.},
doi = {10.1002/nag.2803},
journal = {International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics},
number = 13,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

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