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Title: In-situ electrochemical analysis of microbial activity

Abstract

Microbes have a wide range of metabolic capabilities available that makes them industrially useful organisms. Monitoring these metabolic processes is a crucial component in efficient industrial application. Unfortunately, monitoring these metabolic processes can often be invasive and time consuming and expensive, especially within an anaerobic environment. Electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) offer a non-invasive approach to monitor microbial activity and growth. EIS and CV were used to monitor Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic and endospore-forming bacterium. C. phytofermentans ferments a wide range of sugars into hydrogen, acetate, and ethanol as fermentation by-products. For this study, both traditional microbiological and electrochemical techniques were used to monitor the growth of C. phytofermentans and the formation of fermentation products. An irreversible reduction peak was observed using CV beginning at mid-logarithmic phase of growth. This peak was associated with C. phytofermentans and not the spent medium and was indicative of a decrease in carbon and energy sources to the cells. Additionally, EIS analysis during growth provided information related to increased charge transfer resistance of the culture also as a function of carbon and energy source depletion. Results demonstrate that CV and EIS are useful tools in the monitoringmore » the physiological status of bioprocesses.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States)
  2. Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)
  3. Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)
  4. Savannah River National Lab (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Savannah River National Lab (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1513685
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2018-00580
Journal ID: ISSN 2191-0855
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
AMB Express
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2191-0855
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Bioprocess; Fermentation; In-situ monitoring; Cyclic voltammetry; Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; Charge transfer resistance

Citation Formats

Martin, Ariane L., Satjaritanun, Pongsarun, Shimpalee, Sirivatch, Devivo, Blake A., Weidner, John, Greenway, Scott, Henson, J. Michael, and Turick, Charles E. In-situ electrochemical analysis of microbial activity. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1186/s13568-018-0692-2.
Martin, Ariane L., Satjaritanun, Pongsarun, Shimpalee, Sirivatch, Devivo, Blake A., Weidner, John, Greenway, Scott, Henson, J. Michael, & Turick, Charles E. In-situ electrochemical analysis of microbial activity. United States. doi:10.1186/s13568-018-0692-2.
Martin, Ariane L., Satjaritanun, Pongsarun, Shimpalee, Sirivatch, Devivo, Blake A., Weidner, John, Greenway, Scott, Henson, J. Michael, and Turick, Charles E. Thu . "In-situ electrochemical analysis of microbial activity". United States. doi:10.1186/s13568-018-0692-2. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1513685.
@article{osti_1513685,
title = {In-situ electrochemical analysis of microbial activity},
author = {Martin, Ariane L. and Satjaritanun, Pongsarun and Shimpalee, Sirivatch and Devivo, Blake A. and Weidner, John and Greenway, Scott and Henson, J. Michael and Turick, Charles E.},
abstractNote = {Microbes have a wide range of metabolic capabilities available that makes them industrially useful organisms. Monitoring these metabolic processes is a crucial component in efficient industrial application. Unfortunately, monitoring these metabolic processes can often be invasive and time consuming and expensive, especially within an anaerobic environment. Electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) offer a non-invasive approach to monitor microbial activity and growth. EIS and CV were used to monitor Clostridium phytofermentans, an anaerobic and endospore-forming bacterium. C. phytofermentans ferments a wide range of sugars into hydrogen, acetate, and ethanol as fermentation by-products. For this study, both traditional microbiological and electrochemical techniques were used to monitor the growth of C. phytofermentans and the formation of fermentation products. An irreversible reduction peak was observed using CV beginning at mid-logarithmic phase of growth. This peak was associated with C. phytofermentans and not the spent medium and was indicative of a decrease in carbon and energy sources to the cells. Additionally, EIS analysis during growth provided information related to increased charge transfer resistance of the culture also as a function of carbon and energy source depletion. Results demonstrate that CV and EIS are useful tools in the monitoring the physiological status of bioprocesses.},
doi = {10.1186/s13568-018-0692-2},
journal = {AMB Express},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Recent progress in consolidated bioprocessing
journal, June 2012

  • Olson, Daniel G.; McBride, John E.; Joe Shaw, A.
  • Current Opinion in Biotechnology, Vol. 23, Issue 3, p. 396-405
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.copbio.2011.11.026