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Title: Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

Abstract

The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force–velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force–velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction , and the dislocation character angle , are found to have the strongest influence on the force–velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins inmore » low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1512884
Report Number(s):
SAND-2015-5077J
Journal ID: ISSN 1478-6435; 667114
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Philosophical Magazine (2003, Print)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Philosophical Magazine (2003, Print); Journal Volume: 96; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1478-6435
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Dislocation; solute; drag; Cottrell atmosphere; extended dislocation

Citation Formats

Sills, R. B., and Cai, W. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1080/14786435.2016.1142677.
Sills, R. B., & Cai, W. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations. United States. doi:10.1080/14786435.2016.1142677.
Sills, R. B., and Cai, W. Mon . "Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations". United States. doi:10.1080/14786435.2016.1142677. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1512884.
@article{osti_1512884,
title = {Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations},
author = {Sills, R. B. and Cai, W.},
abstractNote = {The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force–velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force–velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction , and the dislocation character angle , are found to have the strongest influence on the force–velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.},
doi = {10.1080/14786435.2016.1142677},
journal = {Philosophical Magazine (2003, Print)},
number = 10,
volume = 96,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {2}
}

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Cited by: 12 works
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