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Title: Crystallization by particle attachment in synthetic, biogenic, and geologic environments

Abstract

Field and laboratory observations show that crystals commonly form by the addition and attachment of particles that range from multi-ion complexes to fully formed nanoparticles. The particles involved in these nonclassical pathways to crystallization are diverse, in contrast to classical models that consider only the addition of monomeric chemical species. We review progress toward understanding crystal growth by particle-attachment processes and show that multiple pathways result from the interplay of free-energy landscapes and reaction dynamics. Much remains unknown about the fundamental aspects, particularly the relationships between solution structure, interfacial forces, and particle motion. Developing a predictive description that connects molecular details to ensemble behavior will require revisiting long-standing interpretations of crystal formation in synthetic systems, biominerals, and patterns of mineralization in natural environments.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [7];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [11]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  3. Eindhoven Univ. of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)
  4. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
  7. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  8. Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX (United States)
  9. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
  10. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)
  11. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
  12. Univ. of Leeds, West Yorkshire (England)
  13. Univ. of Konstanz, Constance (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1512223
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 349; Journal Issue: 6247; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

De Yoreo, James J., Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A., Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M., Penn, R. Lee, Whitelam, Stephen, Joester, Derk, Zhang, Hengzhong, Rimer, Jeffrey D., Navrotsky, Alexandra, Banfield, Jillian F., Wallace, Adam F., Michel, F. Marc, Meldrum, Fiona C., Colfen, Helmut, and Dove, Patricia M. Crystallization by particle attachment in synthetic, biogenic, and geologic environments. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aaa6760.
De Yoreo, James J., Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A., Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M., Penn, R. Lee, Whitelam, Stephen, Joester, Derk, Zhang, Hengzhong, Rimer, Jeffrey D., Navrotsky, Alexandra, Banfield, Jillian F., Wallace, Adam F., Michel, F. Marc, Meldrum, Fiona C., Colfen, Helmut, & Dove, Patricia M. Crystallization by particle attachment in synthetic, biogenic, and geologic environments. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aaa6760.
De Yoreo, James J., Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A., Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M., Penn, R. Lee, Whitelam, Stephen, Joester, Derk, Zhang, Hengzhong, Rimer, Jeffrey D., Navrotsky, Alexandra, Banfield, Jillian F., Wallace, Adam F., Michel, F. Marc, Meldrum, Fiona C., Colfen, Helmut, and Dove, Patricia M. Fri . "Crystallization by particle attachment in synthetic, biogenic, and geologic environments". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aaa6760. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1512223.
@article{osti_1512223,
title = {Crystallization by particle attachment in synthetic, biogenic, and geologic environments},
author = {De Yoreo, James J. and Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A. and Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M. and Penn, R. Lee and Whitelam, Stephen and Joester, Derk and Zhang, Hengzhong and Rimer, Jeffrey D. and Navrotsky, Alexandra and Banfield, Jillian F. and Wallace, Adam F. and Michel, F. Marc and Meldrum, Fiona C. and Colfen, Helmut and Dove, Patricia M.},
abstractNote = {Field and laboratory observations show that crystals commonly form by the addition and attachment of particles that range from multi-ion complexes to fully formed nanoparticles. The particles involved in these nonclassical pathways to crystallization are diverse, in contrast to classical models that consider only the addition of monomeric chemical species. We review progress toward understanding crystal growth by particle-attachment processes and show that multiple pathways result from the interplay of free-energy landscapes and reaction dynamics. Much remains unknown about the fundamental aspects, particularly the relationships between solution structure, interfacial forces, and particle motion. Developing a predictive description that connects molecular details to ensemble behavior will require revisiting long-standing interpretations of crystal formation in synthetic systems, biominerals, and patterns of mineralization in natural environments.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aaa6760},
journal = {Science},
number = 6247,
volume = 349,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {7}
}

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