skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

This content will become publicly available on March 23, 2020

Title: Diverse Mycorrhizal Associations Enhance Terrestrial C Storage in a Global Model

Abstract

Accurate projections of the terrestrial carbon (C) sink are critical to understanding the future global C cycle and setting CO 2 emission reduction goals. Current earth system models (ESMs) and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) with coupled carbon‐nitrogen cycles project that future terrestrial C sequestration will be limited by nitrogen (N) availability, but the magnitude of N limitation remains a critical uncertainty. Plants use multiple symbiotic nutrient acquisition strategies to mitigate N limitation, but current DGVMs omit these mechanisms. Fully coupling N‐acquiring plant‐microbe symbioses to soil organic matter (SOM) cycling within a DGVM for the first time, we demonstrate that increases in N acquisition via SOM decomposition and atmospheric N 2 fixation could support long‐term enhancement of terrestrial C sequestration at global scales under elevated CO 2. The model reproduced elevated CO2 responses from two experiments (Duke and Oak Ridge) representing contrasting N acquisition strategies. N release from enhanced SOM decomposition supported vegetation growth at Duke, while inorganic N depletion limited growth at Oak Ridge. Global simulations reproduced spatial patterns of N‐acquiring symbioses from a novel niche‐based map of mycorrhizal fungi. Under a 100‐ppm increase in CO2 concentrations, shifts in N acquisition pathways facilitated 200 Pg C of terrestrial Cmore » sequestration over 100 years compared to 50 Pg C for a scenario with static N acquisition pathways. Our results imply that N acquisition strategies are important determinants of terrestrial C sequestration potential under elevated CO 2 and that nitrogen‐enabled DGVMs that omit symbiotic N acquisition may underestimate future terrestrial C uptake.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [7]
  1. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States)
  3. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  5. NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
  6. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  7. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Univ. of Maryland, Frostburg, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1511936
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1507473
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; DE‐AC05‐00OR22725; DESC0016188
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0886-6236
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; nitrogen; mycorrhizae; elevated CO2; global land model; carbon; soil

Citation Formats

Sulman, Benjamin N., Shevliakova, Elena, Brzostek, Edward R., Kivlin, Stephanie N., Malyshev, Sergey, Menge, Duncan N. L., and Zhang, Xin. Diverse Mycorrhizal Associations Enhance Terrestrial C Storage in a Global Model. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1029/2018GB005973.
Sulman, Benjamin N., Shevliakova, Elena, Brzostek, Edward R., Kivlin, Stephanie N., Malyshev, Sergey, Menge, Duncan N. L., & Zhang, Xin. Diverse Mycorrhizal Associations Enhance Terrestrial C Storage in a Global Model. United States. doi:10.1029/2018GB005973.
Sulman, Benjamin N., Shevliakova, Elena, Brzostek, Edward R., Kivlin, Stephanie N., Malyshev, Sergey, Menge, Duncan N. L., and Zhang, Xin. Sat . "Diverse Mycorrhizal Associations Enhance Terrestrial C Storage in a Global Model". United States. doi:10.1029/2018GB005973.
@article{osti_1511936,
title = {Diverse Mycorrhizal Associations Enhance Terrestrial C Storage in a Global Model},
author = {Sulman, Benjamin N. and Shevliakova, Elena and Brzostek, Edward R. and Kivlin, Stephanie N. and Malyshev, Sergey and Menge, Duncan N. L. and Zhang, Xin},
abstractNote = {Accurate projections of the terrestrial carbon (C) sink are critical to understanding the future global C cycle and setting CO2 emission reduction goals. Current earth system models (ESMs) and dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) with coupled carbon‐nitrogen cycles project that future terrestrial C sequestration will be limited by nitrogen (N) availability, but the magnitude of N limitation remains a critical uncertainty. Plants use multiple symbiotic nutrient acquisition strategies to mitigate N limitation, but current DGVMs omit these mechanisms. Fully coupling N‐acquiring plant‐microbe symbioses to soil organic matter (SOM) cycling within a DGVM for the first time, we demonstrate that increases in N acquisition via SOM decomposition and atmospheric N2 fixation could support long‐term enhancement of terrestrial C sequestration at global scales under elevated CO2. The model reproduced elevated CO2 responses from two experiments (Duke and Oak Ridge) representing contrasting N acquisition strategies. N release from enhanced SOM decomposition supported vegetation growth at Duke, while inorganic N depletion limited growth at Oak Ridge. Global simulations reproduced spatial patterns of N‐acquiring symbioses from a novel niche‐based map of mycorrhizal fungi. Under a 100‐ppm increase in CO2 concentrations, shifts in N acquisition pathways facilitated 200 Pg C of terrestrial C sequestration over 100 years compared to 50 Pg C for a scenario with static N acquisition pathways. Our results imply that N acquisition strategies are important determinants of terrestrial C sequestration potential under elevated CO2 and that nitrogen‐enabled DGVMs that omit symbiotic N acquisition may underestimate future terrestrial C uptake.},
doi = {10.1029/2018GB005973},
journal = {Global Biogeochemical Cycles},
number = 4,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on March 23, 2020
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: