skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Sampling in the Dark: Challenges in Fine-Root Research

Abstract

Plant roots play an essential role in the global carbon cycle, but they are often underinvestigated and underrepresented in Earth system models (ESMs). Fine roots are estimated to contribute up to 33% of terrestrial plant production, evidence of their key role in the cycling of carbon, water, and nutrients. Few root-sampling methods are nondestructive, however, and even those methods come with their own set of challenges. This January, root researchers met at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discuss current challenges in root research. They also discussed some possible solutions that may encourage more researchers to undertake belowground projects. Meeting participants have been using minirhizotrons—instruments that use a transparent tube driven into the soil to collect visible wavelength color imagery of plant roots in situ—in tropical forests in Brazil, Panama, and Puerto Rico; in a deciduous woodland; and in a northern peatland.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biosciences
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geography
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1511927
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union (Online); Journal Volume: 100; Journal ID: ISSN 2324-9250
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Ziegler, Clare, Yaffar, Daniela, and Cordeiro, Amanda. Sampling in the Dark: Challenges in Fine-Root Research. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1029/2019EO122695.
Ziegler, Clare, Yaffar, Daniela, & Cordeiro, Amanda. Sampling in the Dark: Challenges in Fine-Root Research. United States. doi:10.1029/2019EO122695.
Ziegler, Clare, Yaffar, Daniela, and Cordeiro, Amanda. Mon . "Sampling in the Dark: Challenges in Fine-Root Research". United States. doi:10.1029/2019EO122695. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1511927.
@article{osti_1511927,
title = {Sampling in the Dark: Challenges in Fine-Root Research},
author = {Ziegler, Clare and Yaffar, Daniela and Cordeiro, Amanda},
abstractNote = {Plant roots play an essential role in the global carbon cycle, but they are often underinvestigated and underrepresented in Earth system models (ESMs). Fine roots are estimated to contribute up to 33% of terrestrial plant production, evidence of their key role in the cycling of carbon, water, and nutrients. Few root-sampling methods are nondestructive, however, and even those methods come with their own set of challenges. This January, root researchers met at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discuss current challenges in root research. They also discussed some possible solutions that may encourage more researchers to undertake belowground projects. Meeting participants have been using minirhizotrons—instruments that use a transparent tube driven into the soil to collect visible wavelength color imagery of plant roots in situ—in tropical forests in Brazil, Panama, and Puerto Rico; in a deciduous woodland; and in a northern peatland.},
doi = {10.1029/2019EO122695},
journal = {Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union (Online)},
number = ,
volume = 100,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: