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Title: The Third Cognitive Revolution: The consequences and possibilities for biomedical research

Abstract

The Third Cognitive Revolution has just started. It follows the ones that, first, brought us the alphabet, numbers, agriculture, and urbanization; and, second, the printing press, books, and the scientific method. The Third Cognitive Revolution (TCR) is characterized by digitalization, computers, the World Wide Web, and global research efforts. While earlier revolutions proceeded at a slow pace over centuries, the current one started only a generation ago and is changing all aspects of human society and even human biology at an unprecedented pace. This leaves little time to analyze the profound effects of these changes and to come to terms with the explosion of knowledge and opportunities that the TCR brings with it. This article explores some of the TCR's positive and some of the troublesome consequences for biomedical research and the social sciences. We focus on two problems: the risk of delaying the adoption of available knowledge and the questionable validity of much of the published literature. To address and hopefully prevent these unintended and problematic developments, we propose and discuss topics that would promote inter– and trans–disciplinary communication.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. College of Charleston, Charleston, SC (United States)
  2. Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV), Yucatan (Mexico)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  4. Univ. of Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)
  5. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Domestic Funding; USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1511634
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-19-22171
Journal ID: ISSN 1469-221X
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
EMBO Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1469-221X
Publisher:
European Molecular Biology Organization
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Biological Science; Interdisciplinary biomedicine

Citation Formats

Hittner, James B., Hoogesteijn, Almira L., Fair, Jeanne Marie, van Regenmortel, Marc H. V., and Rivas, Ariel L. The Third Cognitive Revolution: The consequences and possibilities for biomedical research. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.15252/embr.201847647.
Hittner, James B., Hoogesteijn, Almira L., Fair, Jeanne Marie, van Regenmortel, Marc H. V., & Rivas, Ariel L. The Third Cognitive Revolution: The consequences and possibilities for biomedical research. United States. doi:10.15252/embr.201847647.
Hittner, James B., Hoogesteijn, Almira L., Fair, Jeanne Marie, van Regenmortel, Marc H. V., and Rivas, Ariel L. Fri . "The Third Cognitive Revolution: The consequences and possibilities for biomedical research". United States. doi:10.15252/embr.201847647. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1511634.
@article{osti_1511634,
title = {The Third Cognitive Revolution: The consequences and possibilities for biomedical research},
author = {Hittner, James B. and Hoogesteijn, Almira L. and Fair, Jeanne Marie and van Regenmortel, Marc H. V. and Rivas, Ariel L.},
abstractNote = {The Third Cognitive Revolution has just started. It follows the ones that, first, brought us the alphabet, numbers, agriculture, and urbanization; and, second, the printing press, books, and the scientific method. The Third Cognitive Revolution (TCR) is characterized by digitalization, computers, the World Wide Web, and global research efforts. While earlier revolutions proceeded at a slow pace over centuries, the current one started only a generation ago and is changing all aspects of human society and even human biology at an unprecedented pace. This leaves little time to analyze the profound effects of these changes and to come to terms with the explosion of knowledge and opportunities that the TCR brings with it. This article explores some of the TCR's positive and some of the troublesome consequences for biomedical research and the social sciences. We focus on two problems: the risk of delaying the adoption of available knowledge and the questionable validity of much of the published literature. To address and hopefully prevent these unintended and problematic developments, we propose and discuss topics that would promote inter– and trans–disciplinary communication.},
doi = {10.15252/embr.201847647},
journal = {EMBO Reports},
number = 4,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
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