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Title: Tracking Replicate Divergence in Microbial Community Composition and Function in Experimental Microcosms

Abstract

The study of microbial community functions necessitates replicating microbial communities. Variation in community development over time renders this an imperfect process. Thus, anticipating the likely degree of variation among replicate communities may aid in experimental design. We examined divergence in replicate community composition and function among 128 naturally assembled starting communities obtained from soils, each replicated three times, following a 30-day microcosm incubation period. Bacterial and fungal communities diverged in both composition and function among replicates, but remained much more similar to each other than to communities from different starting inocula. Variation in bacterial community composition among replicates was, however, correlated with variation in dissolved organic carbon production. A smaller-scale experiment testing nine starting communities showed that divergence was similar whether replicates were incubated on sterile or non-sterile pine litter, suggesting the impact of a pre-existing community on replicate divergence is minor. However, replicates in this experiment which were incubated for 114 days diverged more than those incubated for 30 days, suggesting experiments that run over long time periods will likely see greater variation among replicate community composition. Here these results suggest that while replicates diverge at a community level, such divergence is unlikely to severely impede the study ofmore » community function.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1511629
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-19-20283
Journal ID: ISSN 0095-3628
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Microbial Ecology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Microbial Ecology; Journal ID: ISSN 0095-3628
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Biological Science; Community; Microbial community composition; Microcosm; Community replication

Citation Formats

Johansen, Renee, Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson, Gallegos-Graves, La Verne, Lopez, Deanna Lynn, Runde, Andreas Christian, Yoshida, Thomas M., and Dunbar, John Martin. Tracking Replicate Divergence in Microbial Community Composition and Function in Experimental Microcosms. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1007/s00248-019-01368-w.
Johansen, Renee, Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson, Gallegos-Graves, La Verne, Lopez, Deanna Lynn, Runde, Andreas Christian, Yoshida, Thomas M., & Dunbar, John Martin. Tracking Replicate Divergence in Microbial Community Composition and Function in Experimental Microcosms. United States. doi:10.1007/s00248-019-01368-w.
Johansen, Renee, Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson, Gallegos-Graves, La Verne, Lopez, Deanna Lynn, Runde, Andreas Christian, Yoshida, Thomas M., and Dunbar, John Martin. Tue . "Tracking Replicate Divergence in Microbial Community Composition and Function in Experimental Microcosms". United States. doi:10.1007/s00248-019-01368-w.
@article{osti_1511629,
title = {Tracking Replicate Divergence in Microbial Community Composition and Function in Experimental Microcosms},
author = {Johansen, Renee and Albright, Michaeline Burr Nelson and Gallegos-Graves, La Verne and Lopez, Deanna Lynn and Runde, Andreas Christian and Yoshida, Thomas M. and Dunbar, John Martin},
abstractNote = {The study of microbial community functions necessitates replicating microbial communities. Variation in community development over time renders this an imperfect process. Thus, anticipating the likely degree of variation among replicate communities may aid in experimental design. We examined divergence in replicate community composition and function among 128 naturally assembled starting communities obtained from soils, each replicated three times, following a 30-day microcosm incubation period. Bacterial and fungal communities diverged in both composition and function among replicates, but remained much more similar to each other than to communities from different starting inocula. Variation in bacterial community composition among replicates was, however, correlated with variation in dissolved organic carbon production. A smaller-scale experiment testing nine starting communities showed that divergence was similar whether replicates were incubated on sterile or non-sterile pine litter, suggesting the impact of a pre-existing community on replicate divergence is minor. However, replicates in this experiment which were incubated for 114 days diverged more than those incubated for 30 days, suggesting experiments that run over long time periods will likely see greater variation among replicate community composition. Here these results suggest that while replicates diverge at a community level, such divergence is unlikely to severely impede the study of community function.},
doi = {10.1007/s00248-019-01368-w},
journal = {Microbial Ecology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

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This content will become publicly available on April 2, 2020
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