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Title: Species traits and network structure predict the success and impacts of pollinator invasions

Abstract

Species invasions constitute a major and poorly understood threat to plant–pollinator systems. General theory predicting which factors drive species invasion success and subsequent effects on native ecosystems is particularly lacking. We address this problem using a consumer–resource model of adaptive behavior and population dynamics to evaluate the invasion success of alien pollinators into plant–pollinator networks and their impact on native species. We introduce pollinator species with different foraging traits into network models with different levels of species richness, connectance, and nestedness. Among 31 factors tested, including network and alien properties, we find that aliens with high foraging efficiency are the most successful invaders. Networks exhibiting high alien–native diet overlap, fraction of alien-visited plant species, most-generalist plant connectivity, and number of specialist pollinator species are the most impacted by invaders. Our results mimic several disparate observations conducted in the field and potentially elucidate the mechanisms responsible for their variability.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  2. Vibrant Data, San Francisco, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Chile, Santiago (Chile)
  4. Univ. Mayor, Santiago (Chile)
  5. Instituto Argentino de Investigaciones de las Zonas Áridas, Mendoza (Argentina); Univ. Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina)
  6. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1511438
Grant/Contract Number:  
[SC0016247]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1]; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Valdovinos, Fernanda S., Berlow, Eric L., Moisset de Espanés, Pablo, Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo, Vázquez, Diego P., and Martinez, Neo D. Species traits and network structure predict the success and impacts of pollinator invasions. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04593-y.
Valdovinos, Fernanda S., Berlow, Eric L., Moisset de Espanés, Pablo, Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo, Vázquez, Diego P., & Martinez, Neo D. Species traits and network structure predict the success and impacts of pollinator invasions. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04593-y.
Valdovinos, Fernanda S., Berlow, Eric L., Moisset de Espanés, Pablo, Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo, Vázquez, Diego P., and Martinez, Neo D. Thu . "Species traits and network structure predict the success and impacts of pollinator invasions". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04593-y. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1511438.
@article{osti_1511438,
title = {Species traits and network structure predict the success and impacts of pollinator invasions},
author = {Valdovinos, Fernanda S. and Berlow, Eric L. and Moisset de Espanés, Pablo and Ramos-Jiliberto, Rodrigo and Vázquez, Diego P. and Martinez, Neo D.},
abstractNote = {Species invasions constitute a major and poorly understood threat to plant–pollinator systems. General theory predicting which factors drive species invasion success and subsequent effects on native ecosystems is particularly lacking. We address this problem using a consumer–resource model of adaptive behavior and population dynamics to evaluate the invasion success of alien pollinators into plant–pollinator networks and their impact on native species. We introduce pollinator species with different foraging traits into network models with different levels of species richness, connectance, and nestedness. Among 31 factors tested, including network and alien properties, we find that aliens with high foraging efficiency are the most successful invaders. Networks exhibiting high alien–native diet overlap, fraction of alien-visited plant species, most-generalist plant connectivity, and number of specialist pollinator species are the most impacted by invaders. Our results mimic several disparate observations conducted in the field and potentially elucidate the mechanisms responsible for their variability.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-04593-y},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = [1],
volume = [9],
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
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Cited by: 7 works
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Figures / Tables:

Table 1 Table 1: Classification and regression tree (CART, n = 43,200) analyses of introduction outcomes

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    Works referencing / citing this record:

      Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.