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Title: The Power of Environmental Observatories for Advancing Multidisciplinary Research, Outreach, and Decision Support: The Case of the Minnesota River Basin

Abstract

Observatory‐scale data collection efforts allow unprecedented opportunities for integrative, multidisciplinary investigations in large, complex watersheds, which can affect management decisions and policy. Through the National Science Foundation‐funded REACH (REsilience under Accelerated CHange) project, in collaboration with the Intensively Managed Landscapes‐Critical Zone Observatory, we have collected a series of multidisciplinary data sets throughout the Minnesota River Basin in south‐central Minnesota, USA, a 43,400‐km 2 tributary to the Upper Mississippi River. Postglacial incision within the Minnesota River valley created an erosional landscape highly responsive to hydrologic change, allowing for transdisciplinary research into the complex cascade of environmental changes that occur due to hydrology and land use alterations from intensive agricultural management and climate change. Data sets collected include water chemistry and biogeochemical data, geochemical fingerprinting of major sediment sources, high‐resolution monitoring of river bluff erosion, and repeat channel cross‐sectional and bathymetry data following major floods. The data collection efforts led to development of a series of integrative reduced complexity models that provide deeper insight into how water, sediment, and nutrients route and transform through a large channel network and respond to change. These models represent the culmination of efforts to integrate interdisciplinary data sets and science to gain new insights into watershed‐scalemore » processes in order to advance management and decision making. Finally, the purpose of this paper is to present a synthesis of the data sets and models, disseminate them to the community for further research, and identify mechanisms used to expand the temporal and spatial extent of short‐term observatory‐scale data collection efforts.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [8]; ORCiD logo [9]; ORCiD logo [10]; ORCiD logo [11]; ORCiD logo [9]; ORCiD logo [12]; ORCiD logo [13]; ORCiD logo [10]; ORCiD logo [14]; ORCiD logo [9]; ORCiD logo [15]
  1. Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences
  2. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
  3. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). Water Resources Science Program
  4. Univ. of Maryland, Annapolis, MD (United States). National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center; Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Lab.
  5. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Lab.; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering
  6. Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Soil, Water, and Climate
  7. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Lab.; Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran). Dept. of Civil Engineering
  8. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and St. Anthony Falls Lab.; Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering
  9. Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Watershed Sciences
  10. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). School of Environmental and Forest Sciences
  11. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Lab.; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  12. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and St. Anthony Falls Lab.
  13. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  14. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction
  15. Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Lab.; Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Dept. of Earth System Science
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1511244
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-29803
Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001; EAR-1209402; EAR-1331906
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Water Resources Research; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Gran, Karen B., Dolph, C., Baker, A., Bevis, M., Cho, S. J., Czuba, J. A., Dalzell, B., Danesh‐Yazdi, M., Hansen, A. T., Kelly, S., Lang, Z., Schwenk, J., Belmont, P., Finlay, J. C., Kumar, P., Rabotyagov, S., Roehrig, G., Wilcock, P., and Foufoula‐Georgiou, E. The Power of Environmental Observatories for Advancing Multidisciplinary Research, Outreach, and Decision Support: The Case of the Minnesota River Basin. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1029/2018WR024211.
Gran, Karen B., Dolph, C., Baker, A., Bevis, M., Cho, S. J., Czuba, J. A., Dalzell, B., Danesh‐Yazdi, M., Hansen, A. T., Kelly, S., Lang, Z., Schwenk, J., Belmont, P., Finlay, J. C., Kumar, P., Rabotyagov, S., Roehrig, G., Wilcock, P., & Foufoula‐Georgiou, E. The Power of Environmental Observatories for Advancing Multidisciplinary Research, Outreach, and Decision Support: The Case of the Minnesota River Basin. United States. doi:10.1029/2018WR024211.
Gran, Karen B., Dolph, C., Baker, A., Bevis, M., Cho, S. J., Czuba, J. A., Dalzell, B., Danesh‐Yazdi, M., Hansen, A. T., Kelly, S., Lang, Z., Schwenk, J., Belmont, P., Finlay, J. C., Kumar, P., Rabotyagov, S., Roehrig, G., Wilcock, P., and Foufoula‐Georgiou, E. Mon . "The Power of Environmental Observatories for Advancing Multidisciplinary Research, Outreach, and Decision Support: The Case of the Minnesota River Basin". United States. doi:10.1029/2018WR024211.
@article{osti_1511244,
title = {The Power of Environmental Observatories for Advancing Multidisciplinary Research, Outreach, and Decision Support: The Case of the Minnesota River Basin},
author = {Gran, Karen B. and Dolph, C. and Baker, A. and Bevis, M. and Cho, S. J. and Czuba, J. A. and Dalzell, B. and Danesh‐Yazdi, M. and Hansen, A. T. and Kelly, S. and Lang, Z. and Schwenk, J. and Belmont, P. and Finlay, J. C. and Kumar, P. and Rabotyagov, S. and Roehrig, G. and Wilcock, P. and Foufoula‐Georgiou, E.},
abstractNote = {Observatory‐scale data collection efforts allow unprecedented opportunities for integrative, multidisciplinary investigations in large, complex watersheds, which can affect management decisions and policy. Through the National Science Foundation‐funded REACH (REsilience under Accelerated CHange) project, in collaboration with the Intensively Managed Landscapes‐Critical Zone Observatory, we have collected a series of multidisciplinary data sets throughout the Minnesota River Basin in south‐central Minnesota, USA, a 43,400‐km2 tributary to the Upper Mississippi River. Postglacial incision within the Minnesota River valley created an erosional landscape highly responsive to hydrologic change, allowing for transdisciplinary research into the complex cascade of environmental changes that occur due to hydrology and land use alterations from intensive agricultural management and climate change. Data sets collected include water chemistry and biogeochemical data, geochemical fingerprinting of major sediment sources, high‐resolution monitoring of river bluff erosion, and repeat channel cross‐sectional and bathymetry data following major floods. The data collection efforts led to development of a series of integrative reduced complexity models that provide deeper insight into how water, sediment, and nutrients route and transform through a large channel network and respond to change. These models represent the culmination of efforts to integrate interdisciplinary data sets and science to gain new insights into watershed‐scale processes in order to advance management and decision making. Finally, the purpose of this paper is to present a synthesis of the data sets and models, disseminate them to the community for further research, and identify mechanisms used to expand the temporal and spatial extent of short‐term observatory‐scale data collection efforts.},
doi = {10.1029/2018WR024211},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

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This content will become publicly available on February 25, 2020
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