skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Optical Properties of Tensilely Strained Ge Nanomembranes

Abstract

Group-IV semiconductors, which provide the leading materials platform of micro- electronics, are generally unsuitable for light emitting device applications because of their indirect- bandgap nature. This property currently limits the large-scale integration of electronic and photonic functionalities on Si chips. The introduction of tensile strain in Ge, which has the effect of lowering the direct conduction-band minimum relative to the indirect valleys, is a promising approach to address this challenge. Here we review recent work focused on the basic science and technology of mechanically stressed Ge nanomembranes, i.e., single-crystal sheets with thicknesses of a few tens of nanometers, which can sustain particularly large strain levels before the onset of plastic deformation. These nanomaterials have been employed to demonstrate large strain-enhanced photoluminescence, population inversion under optical pumping, and the formation of direct-bandgap Ge. Furthermore, Si-based photonic-crystal cavities have been developed that can be combined with these Ge nanomembranes without limiting their mechanical flexibility. These results highlight the potential of strained Ge as a CMOS-compatible laser material, and more in general the promise of nanomembrane strain engineering for novel device technologies.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Boston Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Photonics Center
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1511044
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-03ER46028
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nanomaterials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2079-4991
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; nanomembranes; optical gain media; group-IV semiconductors; strain engineering

Citation Formats

Paiella, Roberto, and Lagally, Max G. Optical Properties of Tensilely Strained Ge Nanomembranes. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3390/nano8060407.
Paiella, Roberto, & Lagally, Max G. Optical Properties of Tensilely Strained Ge Nanomembranes. United States. doi:10.3390/nano8060407.
Paiella, Roberto, and Lagally, Max G. Wed . "Optical Properties of Tensilely Strained Ge Nanomembranes". United States. doi:10.3390/nano8060407. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1511044.
@article{osti_1511044,
title = {Optical Properties of Tensilely Strained Ge Nanomembranes},
author = {Paiella, Roberto and Lagally, Max G.},
abstractNote = {Group-IV semiconductors, which provide the leading materials platform of micro- electronics, are generally unsuitable for light emitting device applications because of their indirect- bandgap nature. This property currently limits the large-scale integration of electronic and photonic functionalities on Si chips. The introduction of tensile strain in Ge, which has the effect of lowering the direct conduction-band minimum relative to the indirect valleys, is a promising approach to address this challenge. Here we review recent work focused on the basic science and technology of mechanically stressed Ge nanomembranes, i.e., single-crystal sheets with thicknesses of a few tens of nanometers, which can sustain particularly large strain levels before the onset of plastic deformation. These nanomaterials have been employed to demonstrate large strain-enhanced photoluminescence, population inversion under optical pumping, and the formation of direct-bandgap Ge. Furthermore, Si-based photonic-crystal cavities have been developed that can be combined with these Ge nanomembranes without limiting their mechanical flexibility. These results highlight the potential of strained Ge as a CMOS-compatible laser material, and more in general the promise of nanomembrane strain engineering for novel device technologies.},
doi = {10.3390/nano8060407},
journal = {Nanomaterials},
number = 6,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Strained-Germanium Nanostructures for Infrared Photonics
journal, March 2014

  • Boztug, Cicek; S�nchez-P�rez, Jos� R.; Cavallo, Francesca
  • ACS Nano, Vol. 8, Issue 4, p. 3136-3151
  • DOI: 10.1021/nn404739b

Synthesis, assembly and applications of semiconductor nanomembranes
journal, September 2011

  • Rogers, J. A.; Lagally, M. G.; Nuzzo, R. G.
  • Nature, Vol. 477, Issue 7362, p. 45-53
  • DOI: 10.1038/nature10381

Direct-bandgap light-emitting germanium in tensilely strained nanomembranes
journal, November 2011

  • Sanchez-Perez, J. R.; Boztug, C.; Chen, F.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 108, Issue 47, p. 18893-18898
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1107968108

Band structure, deformation potentials, and carrier mobility in strained Si, Ge, and SiGe alloys
journal, August 1996

  • Fischetti, M. V.; Laux, S. E.
  • Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 80, Issue 4, p. 2234-2252
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.363052