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Title: Site- and Species-Specific Influences on Sub-Alpine Conifer Growth in Mt. Rainier National Park, USA

Abstract

Identifying the factors that influence the climate sensitivity of treeline species is critical to understanding carbon sequestration, forest dynamics, and conservation in high elevation forest/meadow ecotones. Using tree cores from four sub-alpine conifer species collected from three sides of Mt. Rainier, WA, USA, we investigated the influences of species identity and sites with different local climates on radial growth–climate relationships. We created chronologies for each species at each site, determined influential plant-relevant annual and seasonal climatic variables influencing growth, and investigated how the strength of climate sensitivity varied across species and location. Overall, similar climate variables constrained growth on all three sides of the mountain for each of the four study species. Summer warmth positively influenced radial growth, whereas snow, spring warmth, previous summer warmth, and spring humidity negatively influenced growth. We discovered only a few subtle differences in the climate sensitivity of co-occurring species at the same site and between the same species at different sites in pairwise comparisons. A model including species by climate interactions provided the best balance between parsimony and fit, but did not lead to substantially greater predictive power relative to a model without site or species interactions. Our results imply that at treeline inmore » moist temperate regions like Mt. Rainier, the same climatic variables drive annual variation in growth across species and locations, despite species differences in physiology and site differences in mean climates.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Carnegie Inst. of Science, Stanford, CA (United States)
  3. Arnold Arboretum of Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1510304
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC02-06ER64159; DEB-1054012; NIH 5R25HG007153-05
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Forests
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1999-4907
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; high elevation conifers; climate sensitivity; tree rings; climatic context; Mt. Rainier National Park; Washington

Citation Formats

Legendre-Fixx, Myesa, Anderegg, Leander, Ettinger, Ailene, and HilleRisLambers, Janneke. Site- and Species-Specific Influences on Sub-Alpine Conifer Growth in Mt. Rainier National Park, USA. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3390/f9010001.
Legendre-Fixx, Myesa, Anderegg, Leander, Ettinger, Ailene, & HilleRisLambers, Janneke. Site- and Species-Specific Influences on Sub-Alpine Conifer Growth in Mt. Rainier National Park, USA. United States. doi:10.3390/f9010001.
Legendre-Fixx, Myesa, Anderegg, Leander, Ettinger, Ailene, and HilleRisLambers, Janneke. Fri . "Site- and Species-Specific Influences on Sub-Alpine Conifer Growth in Mt. Rainier National Park, USA". United States. doi:10.3390/f9010001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1510304.
@article{osti_1510304,
title = {Site- and Species-Specific Influences on Sub-Alpine Conifer Growth in Mt. Rainier National Park, USA},
author = {Legendre-Fixx, Myesa and Anderegg, Leander and Ettinger, Ailene and HilleRisLambers, Janneke},
abstractNote = {Identifying the factors that influence the climate sensitivity of treeline species is critical to understanding carbon sequestration, forest dynamics, and conservation in high elevation forest/meadow ecotones. Using tree cores from four sub-alpine conifer species collected from three sides of Mt. Rainier, WA, USA, we investigated the influences of species identity and sites with different local climates on radial growth–climate relationships. We created chronologies for each species at each site, determined influential plant-relevant annual and seasonal climatic variables influencing growth, and investigated how the strength of climate sensitivity varied across species and location. Overall, similar climate variables constrained growth on all three sides of the mountain for each of the four study species. Summer warmth positively influenced radial growth, whereas snow, spring warmth, previous summer warmth, and spring humidity negatively influenced growth. We discovered only a few subtle differences in the climate sensitivity of co-occurring species at the same site and between the same species at different sites in pairwise comparisons. A model including species by climate interactions provided the best balance between parsimony and fit, but did not lead to substantially greater predictive power relative to a model without site or species interactions. Our results imply that at treeline in moist temperate regions like Mt. Rainier, the same climatic variables drive annual variation in growth across species and locations, despite species differences in physiology and site differences in mean climates.},
doi = {10.3390/f9010001},
journal = {Forests},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

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