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Title: Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET): Following the Evolution of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems with the NSF–NCAR GV

Abstract

The Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET) study was designed to describe and explain the evolution of the boundary layer aerosol, cloud, and thermodynamic structures along trajectories within the North Pacific trade winds. The study centered on seven round trips of the National Science Foundation–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NSF–NCAR) Gulfstream V (GV) between Sacramento, California, and Kona, Hawaii, between 7 July and 9 August 2015. The CSET observing strategy was to sample aerosol, cloud, and boundary layer properties upwind from the transition zone over the North Pacific and to resample these areas two days later. Global Forecast System forecast trajectories were used to plan the outbound flight to Hawaii with updated forecast trajectories setting the return flight plan two days later. Two key elements of the CSET observing system were the newly developed High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Cloud Radar (HCR) and the high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). Together they provided unprecedented characterizations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation structures that were combined with in situ measurements of aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and turbulence properties. The cloud systems sampled included solid stratocumulus infused with smoke from Canadian wildfires, mesoscale cloud–precipitation complexes, and patches of shallow cumuli in very cleanmore » environments. Ultraclean layers observed frequently near the top of the boundary layer were often associated with shallow, optically thin, layered veil clouds. In conclusion, the extensive aerosol, cloud, drizzle, and boundary layer sampling made over open areas of the northeast Pacific along 2-day trajectories during CSET will be an invaluable resource for modeling studies of boundary layer cloud system evolution and its governing physical processes.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [1];  [3];  [7];  [5];  [8];  [9];  [9];  [10];  [10];  [10] more »;  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [10];  [11] « less
  1. Univ. of Miami, Miami, FL (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
  3. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI (United States)
  5. Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)
  6. Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)
  7. Univ. of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)
  8. Max Planck Institute of Chemistry, Mainz, Germany
  9. Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States); NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)
  10. NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States)
  11. Univ. of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Atmospheric System Research
OSTI Identifier:
1509996
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 100; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-0007
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Albrecht, Bruce, Ghate, Virendra, Mohrmann, Johannes, Wood, Robert, Zuidema, Paquita, Bretherton, Christopher, Schwartz, Christian, Eloranta, Edwin, Glienke, Susanne, Donaher, Shaunna, Sarkar, Mampi, McGibbon, Jeremy, Nugent, Alison D., Shaw, Raymond A., Fugal, Jacob, Minnis, Patrick, Paliknoda, Robindra, Lussier, Louis, Jensen, Jorgen, Vivekanandan, J., Ellis, Scott, Tsai, Peisang, Rilling, Robert, Haggerty, Julie, Campos, Teresa, Stell, Meghan, Reeves, Michael, Beaton, Stuart, Allison, John, Stossmeister, Gregory, Hall, Samuel, and Schmidt, Sebastian. Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET): Following the Evolution of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems with the NSF–NCAR GV. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-17-0180.1.
Albrecht, Bruce, Ghate, Virendra, Mohrmann, Johannes, Wood, Robert, Zuidema, Paquita, Bretherton, Christopher, Schwartz, Christian, Eloranta, Edwin, Glienke, Susanne, Donaher, Shaunna, Sarkar, Mampi, McGibbon, Jeremy, Nugent, Alison D., Shaw, Raymond A., Fugal, Jacob, Minnis, Patrick, Paliknoda, Robindra, Lussier, Louis, Jensen, Jorgen, Vivekanandan, J., Ellis, Scott, Tsai, Peisang, Rilling, Robert, Haggerty, Julie, Campos, Teresa, Stell, Meghan, Reeves, Michael, Beaton, Stuart, Allison, John, Stossmeister, Gregory, Hall, Samuel, & Schmidt, Sebastian. Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET): Following the Evolution of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems with the NSF–NCAR GV. United States. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-17-0180.1.
Albrecht, Bruce, Ghate, Virendra, Mohrmann, Johannes, Wood, Robert, Zuidema, Paquita, Bretherton, Christopher, Schwartz, Christian, Eloranta, Edwin, Glienke, Susanne, Donaher, Shaunna, Sarkar, Mampi, McGibbon, Jeremy, Nugent, Alison D., Shaw, Raymond A., Fugal, Jacob, Minnis, Patrick, Paliknoda, Robindra, Lussier, Louis, Jensen, Jorgen, Vivekanandan, J., Ellis, Scott, Tsai, Peisang, Rilling, Robert, Haggerty, Julie, Campos, Teresa, Stell, Meghan, Reeves, Michael, Beaton, Stuart, Allison, John, Stossmeister, Gregory, Hall, Samuel, and Schmidt, Sebastian. Fri . "Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET): Following the Evolution of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems with the NSF–NCAR GV". United States. doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-17-0180.1.
@article{osti_1509996,
title = {Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET): Following the Evolution of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems with the NSF–NCAR GV},
author = {Albrecht, Bruce and Ghate, Virendra and Mohrmann, Johannes and Wood, Robert and Zuidema, Paquita and Bretherton, Christopher and Schwartz, Christian and Eloranta, Edwin and Glienke, Susanne and Donaher, Shaunna and Sarkar, Mampi and McGibbon, Jeremy and Nugent, Alison D. and Shaw, Raymond A. and Fugal, Jacob and Minnis, Patrick and Paliknoda, Robindra and Lussier, Louis and Jensen, Jorgen and Vivekanandan, J. and Ellis, Scott and Tsai, Peisang and Rilling, Robert and Haggerty, Julie and Campos, Teresa and Stell, Meghan and Reeves, Michael and Beaton, Stuart and Allison, John and Stossmeister, Gregory and Hall, Samuel and Schmidt, Sebastian},
abstractNote = {The Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET) study was designed to describe and explain the evolution of the boundary layer aerosol, cloud, and thermodynamic structures along trajectories within the North Pacific trade winds. The study centered on seven round trips of the National Science Foundation–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NSF–NCAR) Gulfstream V (GV) between Sacramento, California, and Kona, Hawaii, between 7 July and 9 August 2015. The CSET observing strategy was to sample aerosol, cloud, and boundary layer properties upwind from the transition zone over the North Pacific and to resample these areas two days later. Global Forecast System forecast trajectories were used to plan the outbound flight to Hawaii with updated forecast trajectories setting the return flight plan two days later. Two key elements of the CSET observing system were the newly developed High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Cloud Radar (HCR) and the high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). Together they provided unprecedented characterizations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation structures that were combined with in situ measurements of aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and turbulence properties. The cloud systems sampled included solid stratocumulus infused with smoke from Canadian wildfires, mesoscale cloud–precipitation complexes, and patches of shallow cumuli in very clean environments. Ultraclean layers observed frequently near the top of the boundary layer were often associated with shallow, optically thin, layered veil clouds. In conclusion, the extensive aerosol, cloud, drizzle, and boundary layer sampling made over open areas of the northeast Pacific along 2-day trajectories during CSET will be an invaluable resource for modeling studies of boundary layer cloud system evolution and its governing physical processes.},
doi = {10.1175/BAMS-D-17-0180.1},
journal = {Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society},
number = 1,
volume = 100,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

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