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Title: Bacterial diversity is positively correlated with soil heterogeneity

Abstract

Plant and animal diversity generally increases with increasing environmental heterogeneity. Here, we test whether this relationship also holds for bacterial communities in soil. Specifically, we investi-gate whether invasive annual grasslands have reduced soil heterogeneity and, thereby, decreased bacterial alpha- and beta-diversity. Soils were sampled at nine sites within a 5-km stretch of Southern California, at five depths in three habitats, including non-native invasive annual grassland, native oak woodland, and native coastal sage scrub. We characterized soil heterogeneity as well as bacterial alpha- and beta-diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing. We found that invasive annual grasslands harbored less soil heterogeneity and reduced bacterial alpha-diversity relative to the two native woody habitats. Further, across all habi-tats and depths, bacterial alpha- and beta-diversity was positively related to soil heterogeneity. These results suggest that plant invasions associated with soil homogenization may lead to reduced microbial diversity.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  2. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Inst. for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine
  4. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Center for Tropical Research
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1509806
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC02-02ER63421; 5T32GM008185-28
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ecosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2150-8925
Publisher:
Ecological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; coastal sage scrub; environmental heterogeneity; grasslands; invasive species; microbial diversity; oak woodland

Citation Formats

Curd, Emily E., Martiny, Jennifer B. H., Li, Huiying, and Smith, Thomas B. Bacterial diversity is positively correlated with soil heterogeneity. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/ecs2.2079.
Curd, Emily E., Martiny, Jennifer B. H., Li, Huiying, & Smith, Thomas B. Bacterial diversity is positively correlated with soil heterogeneity. United States. doi:10.1002/ecs2.2079.
Curd, Emily E., Martiny, Jennifer B. H., Li, Huiying, and Smith, Thomas B. Tue . "Bacterial diversity is positively correlated with soil heterogeneity". United States. doi:10.1002/ecs2.2079. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1509806.
@article{osti_1509806,
title = {Bacterial diversity is positively correlated with soil heterogeneity},
author = {Curd, Emily E. and Martiny, Jennifer B. H. and Li, Huiying and Smith, Thomas B.},
abstractNote = {Plant and animal diversity generally increases with increasing environmental heterogeneity. Here, we test whether this relationship also holds for bacterial communities in soil. Specifically, we investi-gate whether invasive annual grasslands have reduced soil heterogeneity and, thereby, decreased bacterial alpha- and beta-diversity. Soils were sampled at nine sites within a 5-km stretch of Southern California, at five depths in three habitats, including non-native invasive annual grassland, native oak woodland, and native coastal sage scrub. We characterized soil heterogeneity as well as bacterial alpha- and beta-diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing. We found that invasive annual grasslands harbored less soil heterogeneity and reduced bacterial alpha-diversity relative to the two native woody habitats. Further, across all habi-tats and depths, bacterial alpha- and beta-diversity was positively related to soil heterogeneity. These results suggest that plant invasions associated with soil homogenization may lead to reduced microbial diversity.},
doi = {10.1002/ecs2.2079},
journal = {Ecosphere},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Search and clustering orders of magnitude faster than BLAST
journal, August 2010