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Title: An evaluation of the ocean and sea ice climate of E3SM using MPAS and interannual CORE-II forcing

Abstract

The Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) is a new coupled Earth system model sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Here we present E3SM global simulations using active ocean and sea ice that are driven by the CORE–II inter–annual atmospheric forcing data set. The E3SM ocean and sea–ice components are MPAS–Ocean and MPAS–Seaice, which use the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) framework and run on unstructured horizontal meshes. For this study, grid cells vary from 30 to 60 km for the low resolution mesh and 6 to 18 km at high resolution. The vertical grid is a structured z–star coordinate and uses 60 and 80 layers for low and high resolution, respectively. The lower resolution simulation was run for five CORE cycles (310 years) with little drift in sea surface temperature or heat content. The meridional heat transport is within observational range, while the meridional overturning circulation at 26.5° N is low compared to observations. The largest temperature biases occur in the Labrador Sea and western boundary currents, and the mixed layer is deeper than observations at northern high latitudes in the winter months. In the Antarctic, maximum mixed layer depths (MLD) compare well with observations, but themore » spatial MLD pattern is shifted relative to observations. Sea–ice extent, volume and concentration agree well with observations. At high resolution, the sea surface height compares well with satellite observations in mean and variability.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Clemson University Mathematical Sciences Dept., Clemson, NC (United States)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1508547
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-22149
Journal ID: ISSN 1942-2466
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems; Journal ID: ISSN 1942-2466
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences; ocean; sea ice; model

Citation Formats

Petersen, Mark R., Asay-Davis, Xylar S., Berres, Anne S., Chen, Qingshan, Feige, Nils, Hoffman, Matthew J., Jacobsen, Douglas William, Jones, Philip Wiley, Maltrud, Mathew Einar, Price, Stephen F., Ringler, Todd Darwin, Streletz, Gregory Jon, Turner, Adrian Keith, Van Roekell, Luke P., Veneziani, Milena, Wolfe, Jonathan David, Wolfram, Jr., Phillip Justin, and Woodring, Jonathan Lee. An evaluation of the ocean and sea ice climate of E3SM using MPAS and interannual CORE-II forcing. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1029/2018MS001373.
Petersen, Mark R., Asay-Davis, Xylar S., Berres, Anne S., Chen, Qingshan, Feige, Nils, Hoffman, Matthew J., Jacobsen, Douglas William, Jones, Philip Wiley, Maltrud, Mathew Einar, Price, Stephen F., Ringler, Todd Darwin, Streletz, Gregory Jon, Turner, Adrian Keith, Van Roekell, Luke P., Veneziani, Milena, Wolfe, Jonathan David, Wolfram, Jr., Phillip Justin, & Woodring, Jonathan Lee. An evaluation of the ocean and sea ice climate of E3SM using MPAS and interannual CORE-II forcing. United States. doi:10.1029/2018MS001373.
Petersen, Mark R., Asay-Davis, Xylar S., Berres, Anne S., Chen, Qingshan, Feige, Nils, Hoffman, Matthew J., Jacobsen, Douglas William, Jones, Philip Wiley, Maltrud, Mathew Einar, Price, Stephen F., Ringler, Todd Darwin, Streletz, Gregory Jon, Turner, Adrian Keith, Van Roekell, Luke P., Veneziani, Milena, Wolfe, Jonathan David, Wolfram, Jr., Phillip Justin, and Woodring, Jonathan Lee. Sat . "An evaluation of the ocean and sea ice climate of E3SM using MPAS and interannual CORE-II forcing". United States. doi:10.1029/2018MS001373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1508547.
@article{osti_1508547,
title = {An evaluation of the ocean and sea ice climate of E3SM using MPAS and interannual CORE-II forcing},
author = {Petersen, Mark R. and Asay-Davis, Xylar S. and Berres, Anne S. and Chen, Qingshan and Feige, Nils and Hoffman, Matthew J. and Jacobsen, Douglas William and Jones, Philip Wiley and Maltrud, Mathew Einar and Price, Stephen F. and Ringler, Todd Darwin and Streletz, Gregory Jon and Turner, Adrian Keith and Van Roekell, Luke P. and Veneziani, Milena and Wolfe, Jonathan David and Wolfram, Jr., Phillip Justin and Woodring, Jonathan Lee},
abstractNote = {The Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) is a new coupled Earth system model sponsored by the US Department of Energy. Here we present E3SM global simulations using active ocean and sea ice that are driven by the CORE–II inter–annual atmospheric forcing data set. The E3SM ocean and sea–ice components are MPAS–Ocean and MPAS–Seaice, which use the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) framework and run on unstructured horizontal meshes. For this study, grid cells vary from 30 to 60 km for the low resolution mesh and 6 to 18 km at high resolution. The vertical grid is a structured z–star coordinate and uses 60 and 80 layers for low and high resolution, respectively. The lower resolution simulation was run for five CORE cycles (310 years) with little drift in sea surface temperature or heat content. The meridional heat transport is within observational range, while the meridional overturning circulation at 26.5° N is low compared to observations. The largest temperature biases occur in the Labrador Sea and western boundary currents, and the mixed layer is deeper than observations at northern high latitudes in the winter months. In the Antarctic, maximum mixed layer depths (MLD) compare well with observations, but the spatial MLD pattern is shifted relative to observations. Sea–ice extent, volume and concentration agree well with observations. At high resolution, the sea surface height compares well with satellite observations in mean and variability.},
doi = {10.1029/2018MS001373},
journal = {Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

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