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Title: Embedded metallized optical fibers for high temperature applications

Abstract

Embedding fiber optics in metal components could enable new capabilities such as active monitoring of spatially distributed strain. Ultrasonic additive manufacturing is a suitable technique for embedding fiber optics because it allows fibers to be embedded in metals without melting and without the use of epoxy. However, for harsh environments that could have high temperatures or high radiation doses, traditional polymer-coated fibers cannot survive for extended periods of time. This work demonstrates successful embedding of commercially available copper-, nickel-, and aluminum-coated fibers into aluminum without any observable damage to the fiber. Copper-coated fibers embedded in copper show adequate light transmission, although residual strain could not be resolved. With further processing improvements, fibers embedded in copper or other high-temperature materials could enable even higher temperature operation. Optical transmission and spatially distributed strain were measured in the fibers embedded in aluminum. Measurements were taken after embedding and during heating to temperatures greater than 500 °C. Within the embedded region, both the copper- and aluminum-coated fibers showed strain that matched the expected strain in the surrounding aluminum matrix during heating. This suggests a strong interfacial bond strength that exceeds the maximum estimated fiber strain of 1.2% (871 MPa tensile stress). Furthermore this demonstrationmore » of embedded fibers that can survive high temperatures and remain bonded to the metal matrix is the first step toward embedded fiber optic sensors for harsh environment applications.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  3. Fabrisonic LLC, Columbus, OH (United States)
  4. Sheridan Solutions LLC, Saline, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1507865
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Smart Materials and Structures
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0964-1726
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; embedded; fiber optic; sensing; ultrasonic additive manufacturing; structural health monitoring; high temperature

Citation Formats

Petrie, Christian M., Sridharan, Niyanth, Subramanian, Mohan, Hehr, Adam, Norfolk, Mark, and Sheridan, John. Embedded metallized optical fibers for high temperature applications. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1088/1361-665X/ab0b4e.
Petrie, Christian M., Sridharan, Niyanth, Subramanian, Mohan, Hehr, Adam, Norfolk, Mark, & Sheridan, John. Embedded metallized optical fibers for high temperature applications. United States. doi:10.1088/1361-665X/ab0b4e.
Petrie, Christian M., Sridharan, Niyanth, Subramanian, Mohan, Hehr, Adam, Norfolk, Mark, and Sheridan, John. Fri . "Embedded metallized optical fibers for high temperature applications". United States. doi:10.1088/1361-665X/ab0b4e.
@article{osti_1507865,
title = {Embedded metallized optical fibers for high temperature applications},
author = {Petrie, Christian M. and Sridharan, Niyanth and Subramanian, Mohan and Hehr, Adam and Norfolk, Mark and Sheridan, John},
abstractNote = {Embedding fiber optics in metal components could enable new capabilities such as active monitoring of spatially distributed strain. Ultrasonic additive manufacturing is a suitable technique for embedding fiber optics because it allows fibers to be embedded in metals without melting and without the use of epoxy. However, for harsh environments that could have high temperatures or high radiation doses, traditional polymer-coated fibers cannot survive for extended periods of time. This work demonstrates successful embedding of commercially available copper-, nickel-, and aluminum-coated fibers into aluminum without any observable damage to the fiber. Copper-coated fibers embedded in copper show adequate light transmission, although residual strain could not be resolved. With further processing improvements, fibers embedded in copper or other high-temperature materials could enable even higher temperature operation. Optical transmission and spatially distributed strain were measured in the fibers embedded in aluminum. Measurements were taken after embedding and during heating to temperatures greater than 500 °C. Within the embedded region, both the copper- and aluminum-coated fibers showed strain that matched the expected strain in the surrounding aluminum matrix during heating. This suggests a strong interfacial bond strength that exceeds the maximum estimated fiber strain of 1.2% (871 MPa tensile stress). Furthermore this demonstration of embedded fibers that can survive high temperatures and remain bonded to the metal matrix is the first step toward embedded fiber optic sensors for harsh environment applications.},
doi = {10.1088/1361-665X/ab0b4e},
journal = {Smart Materials and Structures},
number = 5,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on April 5, 2020
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