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Title: Incorporation of the Rotor-Equivalent Wind Speed into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model’s Wind Farm Parameterization

Abstract

Wind power installations have been increasing in recent years. Because wind turbines can influence local wind speeds, temperatures, and surface fluxes, weather forecasting models should consider their effects. Wind farm parameterizations do currently exist for numerical weather prediction models. They generally consider two turbine impacts: elevated drag in the region of the wind turbine rotor disk and increased turbulent kinetic energy production. The wind farm parameterization available in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model calculates this drag and TKE as a function of hub-height wind speed. However, recent work has suggested that integrating momentum over the entire rotor disk [via a rotor-equivalent wind speed (REWS)] is more appropriate, especially for cases with high wind shear. In this study, we implement the REWS in the WRF wind farm parameterization and evaluate its impacts in an idealized environment, with varying amounts of wind speed shear and wind directional veer. Specifically, we evaluate three separate cases: neutral stability with low wind shear, high stability with high wind shear, and high stability with nonlinear wind shear. For most situations, use of the REWS with the wind farm parameterization has marginal impacts on model forecasts. However, for scenarios with highly nonlinear wind shear, themore » REWS can significantly affect results.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, and the Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences
  2. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Global Systems Division
  3. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
  4. Vibrant Clean Energy, Boulder (Colorado)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1507679
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5000-73673
Journal ID: ISSN 0027-0644
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308; 1413980
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Monthly Weather Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 147; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-0644
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; atmosphere; mesoscale forecasting; numerical weather prediction/forecasting; parameterization; renewable energy; wind effects

Citation Formats

Redfern, Stephanie, Olson, Joseph B., Lundquist, Julie K., and Clack, Christopher T. M. Incorporation of the Rotor-Equivalent Wind Speed into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model’s Wind Farm Parameterization. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1175/MWR-D-18-0194.1.
Redfern, Stephanie, Olson, Joseph B., Lundquist, Julie K., & Clack, Christopher T. M. Incorporation of the Rotor-Equivalent Wind Speed into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model’s Wind Farm Parameterization. United States. https://doi.org/10.1175/MWR-D-18-0194.1
Redfern, Stephanie, Olson, Joseph B., Lundquist, Julie K., and Clack, Christopher T. M. Tue . "Incorporation of the Rotor-Equivalent Wind Speed into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model’s Wind Farm Parameterization". United States. https://doi.org/10.1175/MWR-D-18-0194.1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1507679.
@article{osti_1507679,
title = {Incorporation of the Rotor-Equivalent Wind Speed into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model’s Wind Farm Parameterization},
author = {Redfern, Stephanie and Olson, Joseph B. and Lundquist, Julie K. and Clack, Christopher T. M.},
abstractNote = {Wind power installations have been increasing in recent years. Because wind turbines can influence local wind speeds, temperatures, and surface fluxes, weather forecasting models should consider their effects. Wind farm parameterizations do currently exist for numerical weather prediction models. They generally consider two turbine impacts: elevated drag in the region of the wind turbine rotor disk and increased turbulent kinetic energy production. The wind farm parameterization available in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model calculates this drag and TKE as a function of hub-height wind speed. However, recent work has suggested that integrating momentum over the entire rotor disk [via a rotor-equivalent wind speed (REWS)] is more appropriate, especially for cases with high wind shear. In this study, we implement the REWS in the WRF wind farm parameterization and evaluate its impacts in an idealized environment, with varying amounts of wind speed shear and wind directional veer. Specifically, we evaluate three separate cases: neutral stability with low wind shear, high stability with high wind shear, and high stability with nonlinear wind shear. For most situations, use of the REWS with the wind farm parameterization has marginal impacts on model forecasts. However, for scenarios with highly nonlinear wind shear, the REWS can significantly affect results.},
doi = {10.1175/MWR-D-18-0194.1},
journal = {Monthly Weather Review},
number = 3,
volume = 147,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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Cited by: 6 works
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Figures / Tables:

FIG. 1 FIG. 1: Eta levels used for this study, as well as their corresponding heights.

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Works referencing / citing this record:

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