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Title: Evolution of damage and failure in an additively manufactured 316L SS structure: experimental reinvestigation of the third Sandia fracture challenge

Abstract

The third Sandia Fracture Challenge (SFC3) was a benchmark problem for comparing experimental and simulated ductile deformation and failure in an additively manufactured (AM) 316L stainless steel structure. One surprising observation from the SFC3 was the Challenge-geometry specimens had low variability in global load versus displacement behavior, attributed to the large stress-concentrating geometric features dominating the global behavior, rather than the AM voids that tend to significantly influence geometries with uniform cross-sections. This current study reinvestigates the damage and failure evolution of the Challenge-geometry specimens, utilizing interrupted tensile testing with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans to monitor AM void and crack growth from a virgin state through complete failure. This study did not find a correlation between global load versus displacement behavior and AM void attributes, such as void volume, location, quantity, and relative size, which incidentally corroborates the observation from the SFC3. However, this study does show that the voids affect the local behavior of damage and failure. Surface defects (i.e. large voids located on the surface, far exceeding the nominal surface roughness) that were near the primary stress concentration affected the location of crack initiation in some cases, but they did not noticeably affect the global response. The fracturemore » surfaces were a combination of classic ductile dimples and crack deviation from a more direct path favoring intersection with AM voids. Even though the AM voids promoted crack deviation, pre-test micro-CT scan statistics of the voids did not allow for conclusive predictions of preferred crack paths. This study is a first step towards investigating the importance of voids on the ductile failure of AM structures with stress concentrations.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1507401
Report Number(s):
SAND-2019-3118J
Journal ID: ISSN 0376-9429; 673607
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Fracture
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: International Journal of Fracture; Journal ID: ISSN 0376-9429
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Kramer, S. L. B., Ivanoff, T. A., Madison, J. D., and Lentfer, A. P. Evolution of damage and failure in an additively manufactured 316L SS structure: experimental reinvestigation of the third Sandia fracture challenge. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1007/s10704-019-00357-x.
Kramer, S. L. B., Ivanoff, T. A., Madison, J. D., & Lentfer, A. P. Evolution of damage and failure in an additively manufactured 316L SS structure: experimental reinvestigation of the third Sandia fracture challenge. United States. doi:10.1007/s10704-019-00357-x.
Kramer, S. L. B., Ivanoff, T. A., Madison, J. D., and Lentfer, A. P. Wed . "Evolution of damage and failure in an additively manufactured 316L SS structure: experimental reinvestigation of the third Sandia fracture challenge". United States. doi:10.1007/s10704-019-00357-x.
@article{osti_1507401,
title = {Evolution of damage and failure in an additively manufactured 316L SS structure: experimental reinvestigation of the third Sandia fracture challenge},
author = {Kramer, S. L. B. and Ivanoff, T. A. and Madison, J. D. and Lentfer, A. P.},
abstractNote = {The third Sandia Fracture Challenge (SFC3) was a benchmark problem for comparing experimental and simulated ductile deformation and failure in an additively manufactured (AM) 316L stainless steel structure. One surprising observation from the SFC3 was the Challenge-geometry specimens had low variability in global load versus displacement behavior, attributed to the large stress-concentrating geometric features dominating the global behavior, rather than the AM voids that tend to significantly influence geometries with uniform cross-sections. This current study reinvestigates the damage and failure evolution of the Challenge-geometry specimens, utilizing interrupted tensile testing with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scans to monitor AM void and crack growth from a virgin state through complete failure. This study did not find a correlation between global load versus displacement behavior and AM void attributes, such as void volume, location, quantity, and relative size, which incidentally corroborates the observation from the SFC3. However, this study does show that the voids affect the local behavior of damage and failure. Surface defects (i.e. large voids located on the surface, far exceeding the nominal surface roughness) that were near the primary stress concentration affected the location of crack initiation in some cases, but they did not noticeably affect the global response. The fracture surfaces were a combination of classic ductile dimples and crack deviation from a more direct path favoring intersection with AM voids. Even though the AM voids promoted crack deviation, pre-test micro-CT scan statistics of the voids did not allow for conclusive predictions of preferred crack paths. This study is a first step towards investigating the importance of voids on the ductile failure of AM structures with stress concentrations.},
doi = {10.1007/s10704-019-00357-x},
journal = {International Journal of Fracture},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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This content will become publicly available on March 27, 2020
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