skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Extreme Convective Storms Over High-Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring

Abstract

Deep convective storms play a key role in severe weather, the hydrological cycle and the global atmospheric circulation. Historically little attention has been paid to the occurrence of intense convective storms in the climatologically cool regions of high latitudes. Yet it is these regions that are experiencing the largest increases of mean surface temperature over the last century. Pattern of convection might be expected to change correspondingly. The 2014 launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory satellite, which features a space-borne Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) providing near-global coverage (65°S to 65°N), has made it possible to establish the occurrence of convective storms at high latitudes. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the radar echoes seen by GPM over a 5-year period (2014-2018) shows that extremely intense deep convective storms do occur often during the warm season (April-September) in the high-latitude continental locations where the increase of Earth’s surface temperature has been greatest. This discovery implies that the occurrence of high latitude extreme convection may be expected to increase in a continually warming world.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1507202
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1507203; OSTI ID: 1526754; OSTI ID: 1542883
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-140934
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830; AC05‐76RL01830; AC02‐05CH11231
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 46; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GPM; convection; 3‐D echo structure; thermodynamics; high‐latitude

Citation Formats

Houze, Jr., Robert A., Wang, Jingyu, Fan, Jiwen, Brodzik, Stacy, and Feng, Zhe. Extreme Convective Storms Over High-Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1029/2019GL082414.
Houze, Jr., Robert A., Wang, Jingyu, Fan, Jiwen, Brodzik, Stacy, & Feng, Zhe. Extreme Convective Storms Over High-Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring. United States. doi:10.1029/2019GL082414.
Houze, Jr., Robert A., Wang, Jingyu, Fan, Jiwen, Brodzik, Stacy, and Feng, Zhe. Wed . "Extreme Convective Storms Over High-Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring". United States. doi:10.1029/2019GL082414.
@article{osti_1507202,
title = {Extreme Convective Storms Over High-Latitude Continental Areas Where Maximum Warming Is Occurring},
author = {Houze, Jr., Robert A. and Wang, Jingyu and Fan, Jiwen and Brodzik, Stacy and Feng, Zhe},
abstractNote = {Deep convective storms play a key role in severe weather, the hydrological cycle and the global atmospheric circulation. Historically little attention has been paid to the occurrence of intense convective storms in the climatologically cool regions of high latitudes. Yet it is these regions that are experiencing the largest increases of mean surface temperature over the last century. Pattern of convection might be expected to change correspondingly. The 2014 launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory satellite, which features a space-borne Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) providing near-global coverage (65°S to 65°N), has made it possible to establish the occurrence of convective storms at high latitudes. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the radar echoes seen by GPM over a 5-year period (2014-2018) shows that extremely intense deep convective storms do occur often during the warm season (April-September) in the high-latitude continental locations where the increase of Earth’s surface temperature has been greatest. This discovery implies that the occurrence of high latitude extreme convection may be expected to increase in a continually warming world.},
doi = {10.1029/2019GL082414},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 46,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082414

Save / Share: