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Title: In Situ Quantification of Biological N 2 Production Using Naturally Occurring 15 N 15 N

Abstract

We describe an approach for determining biological N 2 production in soils based on the proportions of naturally occurring 15N 15N in N 2. Laboratory incubation experiments reveal that biological N 2 production, whether by denitrification or anaerobic ammonia oxidation, yields proportions of 15N 15N in N 2 that are within 1‰ of that predicted for a random distribution of 15N and 14N atoms. This relatively invariant isotopic signature contrasts with that of the atmosphere, which has 15N 15N proportions in excess of the random distribution by 19.1 ± 0.1‰. Depth profiles of gases in agricultural soils from the Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research site show biological N 2 accumulation that accounts for up to 1.6% of the soil N 2. One-dimensional reaction-diffusion modeling of these soil profiles suggests that subsurface N 2 pulses leading to surface emission rates as low as 0.3 mmol N 2 m –2 d –1 can be detected with current analytical precision, decoupled from N 2O production.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [4]
  1. Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)
  2. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  4. Radboud Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1507181
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1508835; OSTI ID: 1511163
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0018409
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Yeung, Laurence Y., Haslun, Joshua A., Ostrom, Nathaniel E., Sun, Tao, Young, Edward D., van Kessel, Maartje A. H. J., Lücker, Sebastian, and Jetten, Mike S. M. In Situ Quantification of Biological N 2 Production Using Naturally Occurring 15 N 15 N. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b00812.
Yeung, Laurence Y., Haslun, Joshua A., Ostrom, Nathaniel E., Sun, Tao, Young, Edward D., van Kessel, Maartje A. H. J., Lücker, Sebastian, & Jetten, Mike S. M. In Situ Quantification of Biological N 2 Production Using Naturally Occurring 15 N 15 N. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b00812.
Yeung, Laurence Y., Haslun, Joshua A., Ostrom, Nathaniel E., Sun, Tao, Young, Edward D., van Kessel, Maartje A. H. J., Lücker, Sebastian, and Jetten, Mike S. M. Thu . "In Situ Quantification of Biological N 2 Production Using Naturally Occurring 15 N 15 N". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b00812.
@article{osti_1507181,
title = {In Situ Quantification of Biological N 2 Production Using Naturally Occurring 15 N 15 N},
author = {Yeung, Laurence Y. and Haslun, Joshua A. and Ostrom, Nathaniel E. and Sun, Tao and Young, Edward D. and van Kessel, Maartje A. H. J. and Lücker, Sebastian and Jetten, Mike S. M.},
abstractNote = {We describe an approach for determining biological N2 production in soils based on the proportions of naturally occurring 15N15N in N2. Laboratory incubation experiments reveal that biological N2 production, whether by denitrification or anaerobic ammonia oxidation, yields proportions of 15N15N in N2 that are within 1‰ of that predicted for a random distribution of 15N and 14N atoms. This relatively invariant isotopic signature contrasts with that of the atmosphere, which has 15N15N proportions in excess of the random distribution by 19.1 ± 0.1‰. Depth profiles of gases in agricultural soils from the Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research site show biological N2 accumulation that accounts for up to 1.6% of the soil N2. One-dimensional reaction-diffusion modeling of these soil profiles suggests that subsurface N2 pulses leading to surface emission rates as low as 0.3 mmol N2 m–2 d–1 can be detected with current analytical precision, decoupled from N2O production.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.9b00812},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.9b00812

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