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Title: 3D Printed Multifunctional, Hyperelastic Silicone Rubber Foam

Abstract

Highly elastic silicone foams, especially those with tunable properties and multifunctionality, are of great interest in numerous fields. However, the liquid nature of silicone precursors and the complicated foaming process hinder the realization of its three-dimensional (3D) printability. Herein, a series of silicone foams with outstanding performance with regards to elasticity, wetting and sensing properties, multifunctionality, and tunability is generated by direct ink writing. Viscoelastic inks are achieved from direct dispersion of sodium chloride in a unique silicone precursor solution. The 3D-architectured silicone rubber exhibits open-celled trimodal porosity, which offers ultraelasticity with hyper compressibility/cycling endurance (near-zero stress/strain loss under 90% compression or 1000 compression cycles), excellent stretchability (210% strain), and superhydrophobicity. The resulting foam is demonstrated to be multifunctional, such that it can work as an oil sorbent with super capacity (1320%) and customizable soft sensor after absorption of carbon nanotubes on the foam surface. The strategy enables tunability of mechanical strength, elasticity, stretchability, and absorbing capacity, while printing different materials together offers property gradients as an extra dimension of tunability. Finally, the first 3D printed silicone foam, which serves an important step toward its application expansion, is achieved.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Macromolecular Science and Engineering
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Sciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1506772
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Functional Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Advanced Functional Materials; Journal ID: ISSN 1616-301X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 3D printing; Hierarchical sponge; Super-elasticity; Super-hydrophobicity; Polydimethylsiloxane elastomer

Citation Formats

Chen, Qiyi, Zhao, Jiayu, Ren, Jingbo, Rong, Lihan, Cao, Peng‐Fei, and Advincula, Rigoberto C. 3D Printed Multifunctional, Hyperelastic Silicone Rubber Foam. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1002/adfm.201900469.
Chen, Qiyi, Zhao, Jiayu, Ren, Jingbo, Rong, Lihan, Cao, Peng‐Fei, & Advincula, Rigoberto C. 3D Printed Multifunctional, Hyperelastic Silicone Rubber Foam. United States. doi:10.1002/adfm.201900469.
Chen, Qiyi, Zhao, Jiayu, Ren, Jingbo, Rong, Lihan, Cao, Peng‐Fei, and Advincula, Rigoberto C. Thu . "3D Printed Multifunctional, Hyperelastic Silicone Rubber Foam". United States. doi:10.1002/adfm.201900469.
@article{osti_1506772,
title = {3D Printed Multifunctional, Hyperelastic Silicone Rubber Foam},
author = {Chen, Qiyi and Zhao, Jiayu and Ren, Jingbo and Rong, Lihan and Cao, Peng‐Fei and Advincula, Rigoberto C.},
abstractNote = {Highly elastic silicone foams, especially those with tunable properties and multifunctionality, are of great interest in numerous fields. However, the liquid nature of silicone precursors and the complicated foaming process hinder the realization of its three-dimensional (3D) printability. Herein, a series of silicone foams with outstanding performance with regards to elasticity, wetting and sensing properties, multifunctionality, and tunability is generated by direct ink writing. Viscoelastic inks are achieved from direct dispersion of sodium chloride in a unique silicone precursor solution. The 3D-architectured silicone rubber exhibits open-celled trimodal porosity, which offers ultraelasticity with hyper compressibility/cycling endurance (near-zero stress/strain loss under 90% compression or 1000 compression cycles), excellent stretchability (210% strain), and superhydrophobicity. The resulting foam is demonstrated to be multifunctional, such that it can work as an oil sorbent with super capacity (1320%) and customizable soft sensor after absorption of carbon nanotubes on the foam surface. The strategy enables tunability of mechanical strength, elasticity, stretchability, and absorbing capacity, while printing different materials together offers property gradients as an extra dimension of tunability. Finally, the first 3D printed silicone foam, which serves an important step toward its application expansion, is achieved.},
doi = {10.1002/adfm.201900469},
journal = {Advanced Functional Materials},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
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Works referenced in this record:

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