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Title: Understanding Microbiome Stability in a Changing World

Abstract

Microbiomes underpin biogeochemical processes, sustain the bases of food webs, and recycle carbon and nutrients. Hence, microbes are frontline players in determining ecosystem responses to environmental change. My research team and I investigate the causes and consequences of microbiome stability. Our primary objective is to understand the responses of complex microbiomes to stressors associated with environmental change. This work is important because Earth is changing rapidly and drastically, and these changes are expected to have serious consequences for ecosystems, their inhabiting organisms, and their microbiomes. Therefore, we aim to understand the repercussions of alterations to microbiome structure and functions and to use this information to predict the responses of microbiomes to stressors. This research is critical to prepare for, respond to, and potentially moderate environmental change. We anticipate that the results of our research will contribute toward these goals and will broadly inform management or manipulation of microbiomes toward desired functions.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1506662
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0018409
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
mSystems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2379-5077
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Centralia; disturbance ecology; diversity reservoir; dormancy; environmental change; microbial ecology; rare biosphere; stability; structure-function; temporal dynamics

Citation Formats

Shade, Ashley. Understanding Microbiome Stability in a Changing World. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1128/mSystems.00157-17.
Shade, Ashley. Understanding Microbiome Stability in a Changing World. United States. doi:10.1128/mSystems.00157-17.
Shade, Ashley. Tue . "Understanding Microbiome Stability in a Changing World". United States. doi:10.1128/mSystems.00157-17. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1506662.
@article{osti_1506662,
title = {Understanding Microbiome Stability in a Changing World},
author = {Shade, Ashley},
abstractNote = {Microbiomes underpin biogeochemical processes, sustain the bases of food webs, and recycle carbon and nutrients. Hence, microbes are frontline players in determining ecosystem responses to environmental change. My research team and I investigate the causes and consequences of microbiome stability. Our primary objective is to understand the responses of complex microbiomes to stressors associated with environmental change. This work is important because Earth is changing rapidly and drastically, and these changes are expected to have serious consequences for ecosystems, their inhabiting organisms, and their microbiomes. Therefore, we aim to understand the repercussions of alterations to microbiome structure and functions and to use this information to predict the responses of microbiomes to stressors. This research is critical to prepare for, respond to, and potentially moderate environmental change. We anticipate that the results of our research will contribute toward these goals and will broadly inform management or manipulation of microbiomes toward desired functions.},
doi = {10.1128/mSystems.00157-17},
journal = {mSystems},
number = 2,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

FIG 1 FIG 1: The Shade research team sampling soil above the coal seam fire, Centralia, PA, in October 2015.

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Works referenced in this record:

A Synthetic Community System for Probing Microbial Interactions Driven by Exometabolites
journal, November 2017


Divergent extremes but convergent recovery of bacterial and archaeal soil communities to an ongoing subterranean coal mine fire
journal, March 2017

  • Lee, Sang-Hoon; Sorensen, Jackson W.; Grady, Keara L.
  • The ISME Journal, Vol. 11, Issue 6
  • DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2017.1

Diversity is the question, not the answer
journal, September 2016


Mapping the coal fire at Centralia, Pa using thermal infrared imagery
journal, September 2011


Temporal patterns of rarity provide a more complete view of microbial diversity
journal, June 2015


Looking back at the Centralia coal fire: a synopsis of its present status
journal, July 2004


Nitrogen Changes and Domain Bacteria Ribotype Diversity in Soils Overlying the Centralia, Pennsylvania Underground coal mine fire
journal, January 2005


Community structure explains antibiotic resistance gene dynamics over a temperature gradient in soil
journal, February 2018


    Figures / Tables found in this record:

      Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.