skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Effects of the distribution and evolution of the coefficient of friction along a fault on the assessment of the seismic activity associated with a hypothetical industrial-scale geologic CO 2 sequestration operation

Abstract

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in geological formations is considered as a promising option that could limit CO 2 emissions from human activities into the atmosphere. However, there is a risk that pressure buildup inside the storage formation can induce slip along preexisting faults and create seismic event felt by the population. To prevent this to happen a geomechanical fault stability analysis should be performed, considering uncertainties of input parameters. In this paper, we investigate how the distribution of the coefficient of friction and the applied frictional law could influence the assessment of fault stability and the characteristics of potential injection-induced seismic events. Our modelling study is based on a hypothetical industrial-scale carbon sequestration project located in the Southern San Joaquin Basin in California, USA, where the stability on a major (25 km long) fault that bounds the sequestration site is assessed during 50 years of CO 2 injection. We conduct nine simulations in which the distributions of the coefficients of static and dynamic friction are changed to simulate a hardening and softening phase before and during rupture. Here, our main findings are: (i) variations in friction along the fault have an important effect on the predicted seismic activity, withmore » maximum magnitude ranging from 1.88 to 5.88 and number of seismic events ranging from 338 to 3272; (ii) the extreme values of the coefficient of friction (lowest and highest) present along the rupture area control how much stress is accumulated before rupture; and (iii) an argillaceous caprock can prevent the development of large magnitude seismic events but favor the occurrence of a large number of smaller events.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Geoscience Division
  2. Federal Inst. of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland). Swiss Seismological Service
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE); Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1506281
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1496436
Grant/Contract Number:  
[AC02-05CH11231; PZENP2_160555]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 66; Journal Issue: C]; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Jeanne, Pierre, Rutqvist, Jonny, Foxall, William, Rinaldi, Antonio Pio, Wainwright, Haruko M., Zhou, Quanlin, Birkholzer, Jens, and Layland-Bachmann, Corinne. Effects of the distribution and evolution of the coefficient of friction along a fault on the assessment of the seismic activity associated with a hypothetical industrial-scale geologic CO2 sequestration operation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.09.018.
Jeanne, Pierre, Rutqvist, Jonny, Foxall, William, Rinaldi, Antonio Pio, Wainwright, Haruko M., Zhou, Quanlin, Birkholzer, Jens, & Layland-Bachmann, Corinne. Effects of the distribution and evolution of the coefficient of friction along a fault on the assessment of the seismic activity associated with a hypothetical industrial-scale geologic CO2 sequestration operation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.09.018.
Jeanne, Pierre, Rutqvist, Jonny, Foxall, William, Rinaldi, Antonio Pio, Wainwright, Haruko M., Zhou, Quanlin, Birkholzer, Jens, and Layland-Bachmann, Corinne. Tue . "Effects of the distribution and evolution of the coefficient of friction along a fault on the assessment of the seismic activity associated with a hypothetical industrial-scale geologic CO2 sequestration operation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.09.018. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1506281.
@article{osti_1506281,
title = {Effects of the distribution and evolution of the coefficient of friction along a fault on the assessment of the seismic activity associated with a hypothetical industrial-scale geologic CO2 sequestration operation},
author = {Jeanne, Pierre and Rutqvist, Jonny and Foxall, William and Rinaldi, Antonio Pio and Wainwright, Haruko M. and Zhou, Quanlin and Birkholzer, Jens and Layland-Bachmann, Corinne},
abstractNote = {Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in geological formations is considered as a promising option that could limit CO2 emissions from human activities into the atmosphere. However, there is a risk that pressure buildup inside the storage formation can induce slip along preexisting faults and create seismic event felt by the population. To prevent this to happen a geomechanical fault stability analysis should be performed, considering uncertainties of input parameters. In this paper, we investigate how the distribution of the coefficient of friction and the applied frictional law could influence the assessment of fault stability and the characteristics of potential injection-induced seismic events. Our modelling study is based on a hypothetical industrial-scale carbon sequestration project located in the Southern San Joaquin Basin in California, USA, where the stability on a major (25 km long) fault that bounds the sequestration site is assessed during 50 years of CO2 injection. We conduct nine simulations in which the distributions of the coefficients of static and dynamic friction are changed to simulate a hardening and softening phase before and during rupture. Here, our main findings are: (i) variations in friction along the fault have an important effect on the predicted seismic activity, with maximum magnitude ranging from 1.88 to 5.88 and number of seismic events ranging from 338 to 3272; (ii) the extreme values of the coefficient of friction (lowest and highest) present along the rupture area control how much stress is accumulated before rupture; and (iii) an argillaceous caprock can prevent the development of large magnitude seismic events but favor the occurrence of a large number of smaller events.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2017.09.018},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = [C],
volume = [66],
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

Fig. 1 Fig. 1: Geological cross section the Southern San Joaquin Basin (from Wagoner, 2009).

Save / Share: