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Title: Dark quark nuggets

Abstract

“Dark quark nuggets,” a lump of dark quark matter, can be produced in the early universe for a wide range of confining gauge theories and serve as a macroscopic dark matter candidate. The two necessary conditions, a nonzero dark baryon number asymmetry and a first-order phase transition, can easily be satisfied for many asymmetric dark matter models and QCD-like gauge theories with a few massless flavors. For confinement scales from 10 keV to 100 TeV, these dark quark nuggets with a huge dark baryon number have their masses vary from 10 23 g to 10 –7 g and their radii from 10 8 cm to 10 –15 cm. Such macroscopic dark matter candidates can be searched for by a broad scope of experiments and even new detection strategies. Specifically, we have found that the gravitational microlensing experiments can probe heavier dark quark nuggets or smaller confinement scales around 10 keV; collision of dark quark nuggets can generate detectable and transient electromagnetic radiation signals; the stochastic gravitational wave signals from the first-order phase transition can be probed by the pulsar timing array observations and other space-based interferometry experiments; the approximately massless dark mesons can behave as dark radiation to be tested by the next-generationmore » cosmic microwave background experiments; the free dark baryons, as a subcomponent of dark matter, can have direct detection signals for a sufficiently strong interaction strength with the visible sector.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
  2. Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  3. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1503927
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1488602
Report Number(s):
arXiv:1810.04360; FERMILAB-PUB-18-600-T
Journal ID: ISSN 2470-0010; PRVDAQ; 1697698
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359; SC0017647; SC0007859
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review D
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 99; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2470-0010
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Bai, Yang, Long, Andrew J., and Lu, Sida. Dark quark nuggets. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.99.055047.
Bai, Yang, Long, Andrew J., & Lu, Sida. Dark quark nuggets. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.99.055047.
Bai, Yang, Long, Andrew J., and Lu, Sida. Fri . "Dark quark nuggets". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevD.99.055047.
@article{osti_1503927,
title = {Dark quark nuggets},
author = {Bai, Yang and Long, Andrew J. and Lu, Sida},
abstractNote = {“Dark quark nuggets,” a lump of dark quark matter, can be produced in the early universe for a wide range of confining gauge theories and serve as a macroscopic dark matter candidate. The two necessary conditions, a nonzero dark baryon number asymmetry and a first-order phase transition, can easily be satisfied for many asymmetric dark matter models and QCD-like gauge theories with a few massless flavors. For confinement scales from 10 keV to 100 TeV, these dark quark nuggets with a huge dark baryon number have their masses vary from 1023 g to 10–7 g and their radii from 108 cm to 10–15 cm. Such macroscopic dark matter candidates can be searched for by a broad scope of experiments and even new detection strategies. Specifically, we have found that the gravitational microlensing experiments can probe heavier dark quark nuggets or smaller confinement scales around 10 keV; collision of dark quark nuggets can generate detectable and transient electromagnetic radiation signals; the stochastic gravitational wave signals from the first-order phase transition can be probed by the pulsar timing array observations and other space-based interferometry experiments; the approximately massless dark mesons can behave as dark radiation to be tested by the next-generation cosmic microwave background experiments; the free dark baryons, as a subcomponent of dark matter, can have direct detection signals for a sufficiently strong interaction strength with the visible sector.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevD.99.055047},
journal = {Physical Review D},
number = 5,
volume = 99,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.99.055047

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