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Title: Integration in a depot‐based decentralized biorefinery system: Corn stover‐based cellulosic biofuel

Abstract

The current or “conventional” paradigm for producing process energy in a biorefinery processing cellulosic biomass is on–site energy recovery through combustion of residual solids and biogas generated by the process. Excess electricity is then exported, resulting in large greenhouse gas (GHG) credits. However, this approach will cause lifecycle GHG emissions of biofuels to increase as more renewable energy sources (wind, solar, etc.) participate in grid–electricity generation, and the GHG credits from displacing fossil fuel decrease. To overcome this drawback, a decentralized (depot–based) biorefinery can be integrated with a coal–fired power plant near a large urban area. In an integrated, decentralized, depot–based biorefinery (IDB), the residual solids are co–fired with coal either in the adjacent power plant or in coal–fired boilers elsewhere to displace coal. An IDB system does not rely on indirect GHG credits through grid–electricity displacement. In an IDB system, biogas from the wastewater treatment facility is also upgraded to biomethane and used as a transportation biofuel. The GHG savings per unit of cropland in the IDB systems (2.7–2.9 MgCO2/ha) are 1.5–1.6 fold greater than those in a conventional centralized system (1.7–1.8 MgCO2/ha). Importantly, the biofuel selling price in the IDBs is lower by 28–30 cents per gasoline–equivalent litermore » than in the conventional centralized system. Furthermore, the total capital investment per annual biofuel volume in the IDB is much lower (by ~80%) than that in the conventional centralized system. Therefore, utilization of biomethane and residual solids in the IDB systems leads to much lower biofuel selling prices and significantly greater GHG savings per unit of cropland participating in the biorefinery system compared to the conventional centralized biorefineries.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [9]
  1. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Michigan State University East Lansing Michigan, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Michigan State University Lansing Michigan
  2. School of Environmental and Biological Engineering Nanjing University of Science and Technology Nanjing China
  3. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Michigan State University East Lansing Michigan, Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences Michigan State University East Lansing Michigan
  4. Joint Global Change Research Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory College Park Maryland
  5. Meier Engineering Research St Stoughton Wisconsin
  6. Department of Geographical Sciences University of Maryland College Park Maryland
  7. Department of Geographical Sciences University of Maryland College Park Maryland, Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Texas A&,M University Temple Texas
  8. Chemical Engineering and Materials Science Michigan State University Lansing Michigan, Department of Engineering Technology, Biotechnology Program, School of Technology University of Houston Houston Texas
  9. Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center University of Wisconsin‐Madison Madison Wisconsin
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1503392
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1503393; OSTI ID: 1542100
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-144422
Journal ID: ISSN 1757-1693
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC02-07ER64494; AC05-76RL01830; SC0018409
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Global Change Biology. Bioenergy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Global Change Biology. Bioenergy Journal Volume: 11 Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1757-1693
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; Biofuel; biofuel selling price; biomethane; coal‐fired power plant; corn stover; ethanol; greenhouse gas; integrated depot‐based decentralized biorefinery; supply chain

Citation Formats

Kim, Seungdo, Dale, Bruce E., Jin, Mingjie, Thelen, Kurt D., Zhang, Xuesong, Meier, Paul, Reddy, Ashwan Daram, Jones, Curtis Dinneen, Cesar Izaurralde, Roberto, Balan, Venkatesh, Runge, Troy, and Sharara, Mahmoud. Integration in a depot‐based decentralized biorefinery system: Corn stover‐based cellulosic biofuel. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12613.
Kim, Seungdo, Dale, Bruce E., Jin, Mingjie, Thelen, Kurt D., Zhang, Xuesong, Meier, Paul, Reddy, Ashwan Daram, Jones, Curtis Dinneen, Cesar Izaurralde, Roberto, Balan, Venkatesh, Runge, Troy, & Sharara, Mahmoud. Integration in a depot‐based decentralized biorefinery system: Corn stover‐based cellulosic biofuel. United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12613
Kim, Seungdo, Dale, Bruce E., Jin, Mingjie, Thelen, Kurt D., Zhang, Xuesong, Meier, Paul, Reddy, Ashwan Daram, Jones, Curtis Dinneen, Cesar Izaurralde, Roberto, Balan, Venkatesh, Runge, Troy, and Sharara, Mahmoud. Mon . "Integration in a depot‐based decentralized biorefinery system: Corn stover‐based cellulosic biofuel". United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12613.
@article{osti_1503392,
title = {Integration in a depot‐based decentralized biorefinery system: Corn stover‐based cellulosic biofuel},
author = {Kim, Seungdo and Dale, Bruce E. and Jin, Mingjie and Thelen, Kurt D. and Zhang, Xuesong and Meier, Paul and Reddy, Ashwan Daram and Jones, Curtis Dinneen and Cesar Izaurralde, Roberto and Balan, Venkatesh and Runge, Troy and Sharara, Mahmoud},
abstractNote = {The current or “conventional” paradigm for producing process energy in a biorefinery processing cellulosic biomass is on–site energy recovery through combustion of residual solids and biogas generated by the process. Excess electricity is then exported, resulting in large greenhouse gas (GHG) credits. However, this approach will cause lifecycle GHG emissions of biofuels to increase as more renewable energy sources (wind, solar, etc.) participate in grid–electricity generation, and the GHG credits from displacing fossil fuel decrease. To overcome this drawback, a decentralized (depot–based) biorefinery can be integrated with a coal–fired power plant near a large urban area. In an integrated, decentralized, depot–based biorefinery (IDB), the residual solids are co–fired with coal either in the adjacent power plant or in coal–fired boilers elsewhere to displace coal. An IDB system does not rely on indirect GHG credits through grid–electricity displacement. In an IDB system, biogas from the wastewater treatment facility is also upgraded to biomethane and used as a transportation biofuel. The GHG savings per unit of cropland in the IDB systems (2.7–2.9 MgCO2/ha) are 1.5–1.6 fold greater than those in a conventional centralized system (1.7–1.8 MgCO2/ha). Importantly, the biofuel selling price in the IDBs is lower by 28–30 cents per gasoline–equivalent liter than in the conventional centralized system. Furthermore, the total capital investment per annual biofuel volume in the IDB is much lower (by ~80%) than that in the conventional centralized system. Therefore, utilization of biomethane and residual solids in the IDB systems leads to much lower biofuel selling prices and significantly greater GHG savings per unit of cropland participating in the biorefinery system compared to the conventional centralized biorefineries.},
doi = {10.1111/gcbb.12613},
journal = {Global Change Biology. Bioenergy},
number = 7,
volume = 11,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12613

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