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Title: Recombinant DNA modification of gibberellin metabolism alters growth rate and biomass allocation in Populus

Abstract

Overexpression of genes that modify gibberellin (GA) metabolism and signaling have been previously shown to produce trees with improved biomass production but highly disturbed development. In order to examine if more subtle types of genetic modification of GA could improve growth rate and modify tree architecture, we transformed a model poplar genotype (Populus tremula × P. alba) with eight genes, including two cisgenes (intact copies of native genes), four intragenes (modified copies of native genes), and two transgenes (from sexually incompatible species), and studied their effects under greenhouse and field conditions. In the greenhouse, four out of the eight tested genes produced a significant and often striking improvement of stem volume, and two constructs significantly modified the proportion of root or shoot biomass. Characterization of GA concentrations in the cisgenic population that had an additional copy of a poplar GA20-oxidase gene showed elevated concentrations of 13-hydroxylated GAs compared to wild-type poplars. In the field, we observed growth improvement for three of the six tested constructs, but it was significantly greater for only one of the constructs, a pRGL:GA20-oxidase intragene. The greenhouse and field responses were highly variable, possibly to due to cross-talk among the GA pathway and other stress responsemore » pathways, or due to interactions between the cisgenes and intragenes with highly similar endogenes. Our results indicate that extensive field trials, similar to those required for conventional breeding, will be critical to evaluating the value and pleiotropic effects of GA-modifying genes.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [6];  [6];  [7]
  1. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society
  2. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society; MANAS, Chennai (India)
  3. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society and College of Agricultural Sciences
  4. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society and Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology
  5. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society; Delaware Biotechnology Inst., Newark, DE (United States)
  6. Univ. of Lethbridge (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences
  7. Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science and Forestry and Wood Products Building
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division; Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO); Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR), St. Simons Island, GA (United States); ArborGen, LLC, Ridgeville, SC (United States); US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA); Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1503042
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1434578
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-06ER64185; FG02-05ER64113; GO12026-203A; 04412; 2003-04345; 2004-35300-14687
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Tree Genetics & Genomes
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-2942
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Cisgenic; Intragenic; Transformation; Plant Architecture; Genetic Engineering; Forest Biotechnology

Citation Formats

Lu, Haiwei, Viswanath, Venkatesh, Ma, Cathleen, Etherington, Elizabeth, Dharmawardhana, Palitha, Shevchenko, Olga, Strauss, Steven H., Pearce, David W., Rood, Stewart B., and Busov, Victor. Recombinant DNA modification of gibberellin metabolism alters growth rate and biomass allocation in Populus. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1007/s11295-015-0952-0.
Lu, Haiwei, Viswanath, Venkatesh, Ma, Cathleen, Etherington, Elizabeth, Dharmawardhana, Palitha, Shevchenko, Olga, Strauss, Steven H., Pearce, David W., Rood, Stewart B., & Busov, Victor. Recombinant DNA modification of gibberellin metabolism alters growth rate and biomass allocation in Populus. United States. doi:10.1007/s11295-015-0952-0.
Lu, Haiwei, Viswanath, Venkatesh, Ma, Cathleen, Etherington, Elizabeth, Dharmawardhana, Palitha, Shevchenko, Olga, Strauss, Steven H., Pearce, David W., Rood, Stewart B., and Busov, Victor. Fri . "Recombinant DNA modification of gibberellin metabolism alters growth rate and biomass allocation in Populus". United States. doi:10.1007/s11295-015-0952-0.
@article{osti_1503042,
title = {Recombinant DNA modification of gibberellin metabolism alters growth rate and biomass allocation in Populus},
author = {Lu, Haiwei and Viswanath, Venkatesh and Ma, Cathleen and Etherington, Elizabeth and Dharmawardhana, Palitha and Shevchenko, Olga and Strauss, Steven H. and Pearce, David W. and Rood, Stewart B. and Busov, Victor},
abstractNote = {Overexpression of genes that modify gibberellin (GA) metabolism and signaling have been previously shown to produce trees with improved biomass production but highly disturbed development. In order to examine if more subtle types of genetic modification of GA could improve growth rate and modify tree architecture, we transformed a model poplar genotype (Populus tremula × P. alba) with eight genes, including two cisgenes (intact copies of native genes), four intragenes (modified copies of native genes), and two transgenes (from sexually incompatible species), and studied their effects under greenhouse and field conditions. In the greenhouse, four out of the eight tested genes produced a significant and often striking improvement of stem volume, and two constructs significantly modified the proportion of root or shoot biomass. Characterization of GA concentrations in the cisgenic population that had an additional copy of a poplar GA20-oxidase gene showed elevated concentrations of 13-hydroxylated GAs compared to wild-type poplars. In the field, we observed growth improvement for three of the six tested constructs, but it was significantly greater for only one of the constructs, a pRGL:GA20-oxidase intragene. The greenhouse and field responses were highly variable, possibly to due to cross-talk among the GA pathway and other stress response pathways, or due to interactions between the cisgenes and intragenes with highly similar endogenes. Our results indicate that extensive field trials, similar to those required for conventional breeding, will be critical to evaluating the value and pleiotropic effects of GA-modifying genes.},
doi = {10.1007/s11295-015-0952-0},
journal = {Tree Genetics & Genomes},
number = 6,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1007/s11295-015-0952-0

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Cited by: 2 works
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Works referenced in this record:

The Path Forward for Biofuels and Biomaterials
journal, January 2006

  • Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Williams, Charlotte K.; Davison, Brian H.
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  • DOI: 10.1126/science.1114736

    Works referencing / citing this record: